Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Korea, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Authors: Cross, D., Li, Q., Smith, P. K., & Monks, H.

Year: 2012

Title: Understanding and preventing cyberbullying: where have we been and where should we be going?

Journal: Q. Li, D. Cross, & P. K. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the global playground: Research from international perspectives

URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119954484.ch14

Abstract: This book contributes to an understanding of cyberbullying, its nature, harmful effects, and correlates of this behavior as it affects young people. Many previous publications on cyberbullying have focused on studies in North America. However, in this book we have presented findings from eleven countries: Australia, Austria, Canada, England, Finland, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain, South Korea, and the United States. By providing a range of cultural perspectives, this collection of research aims to contribute new knowledge about the cross-cultural issues relevant to cyberbullying, and the generality or specificity of findings. Beyond that, we hope to develop more effective strategies to prevent and reduce harm from cyberbullying. This chapter discusses some issues arising from the research presented in the twelve empirical studies in this book, and considers the implications of this and other relevant research for the design, development, and evaluation of cyberbullying interventions.

Citation: Cross, D., Li, Q., Smith, P. K., & Monks, H. (2012). Understanding and preventing cyberbullying: where have we been and where should we be going?. Q. Li, D. Cross, & P. K. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the global playground: Research from international perspectives.


Author(s): Song, J., & Oh, I.

Year: 2017

Title: Factors influencing bystanders’ behavioral reactions in cyberbullying situations

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563217305824

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the experiential, psychological, and situational factors influencing behavioral reactions of bystanders witnessing cyberbullying. It also investigated whether the ‘bystander effect’ is valid in cyberbullying situations. In addition, a moderation effect of the presence of other bystanders was examined between various influencing factors and bystander’s defending tendency. A total of 1058 middle and high school students in metropolitan areas participated in the study, and the experiences of 331 students who have witnessed cyberbullying were analyzed. First, four types of bystanders were found: outsiders were the majority (n=201, 60.7%), followed by defenders (n=101, 30.5%), reinforcers (n=18, 5.4%), and assistants (n=11, 3.3%). Second, bystanders demonstrated more defending behaviors in the absence of other bystanders, thereby validating the ‘bystander effect’ in cyberbullying situations. Third, low moral disengagement, low anti-social conformity, high perceived control of the situation and bad relationship with bullies were identified as significant predictors of a bystander’s defending tendency. Finally, the presence of other bystanders moderated the effect between moral disengagement and the bystander’s defending tendency in relation to bullies. The implications of these results for the effective prevention and intervention of cyberbullying are discussed.

Citation: Song, J., & Oh, I. (2017). Factors influencing bystanders’ behavioral reactions in cyberbullying situations.Computers in Human Behavior,78, 273-282.


Author(s): Lee, J. M., Hong, J. S., Yoon, J., Peguero, A. A., & Seok, H. J.

Year: 2017

Title: Correlates of Adolescent Cyberbullying in South Korea in Multiple Contexts: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Research and School Practice

Journal: Deviant Behavior

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2016.1269568

Abstract: Cyberbullying is rapidly increasing in South Korea. The present article reviews research on factors associated with cyberbullying perpetration and victimization in South Korea. Study findings suggest a number of factors within individual, family, peer, and school levels. Relations with parents, parental verbal abuse, and a lack of attachment are related to perpetration. Delinquent peer association is positively associated with perpetration and victimization, and students’ school satisfaction is negatively associated with this victimization. Adolescents’ use of social networking sites and social media and lack of rules in cyberspace are found to increase perpetration and victimization. Research and practice implications are discussed.

Citation: Lee, J. M., Hong, J. S., Yoon, J., Peguero, A. A., & Seok, H. J. (2017). Correlates of Adolescent Cyberbullying in South Korea in Multiple Contexts: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Research and School Practice.Deviant Behavior, 1-16.


Author(s): Lee, J. Y., Kwon, Y., Yang, S., Park, S., Kim, E. M., & Na, E. Y.

Year: 2017

Title: Differences in Friendship Networks and Experiences of Cyberbullying among Korean and Australian Adolescents

Journal: The Journal of genetic psychology

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00221325.2016.1242475

Abstract: Cyberbullying is one of the negative consequences of online social interaction. The digital environment enables adolescents to engage in online social interaction beyond the traditional physical boundaries of families, neighborhoods, and schools. The authors examined connections to friendship networks in both online and offline settings are related to their experiences as victims, perpetrators, and bystanders of cyberbullying. A comparative face-to-face survey of adolescents (12–15-year-olds) was conducted in Korea (n= 520) and Australia (n= 401). The results reveal that online networks are partially related to cyberbullying in both countries, showing the size of social network sites was significantly correlated with experience cyberbullying among adolescents in both countries. However there were cultural differences in the impact of friendship networks on cyberbullying. The size of the online and offline networks has a stronger impact on the cyberbullying experiences in Korea than it does in Australia. In particular, the number of friends in cliques was positively related to both bullying and victimization in Korea.

Citation: Lee, J. Y., Kwon, Y., Yang, S., Park, S., Kim, E. M., & Na, E. Y. (2017). Differences in Friendship Networks and Experiences of Cyberbullying among Korean and Australian Adolescents.The Journal of genetic psychology,178(1), 44-57.


Author(s): Lee, C., & Shin, N.

Year: 2017

Title: Prevalence of cyberbullying and predictors of cyberbullying perpetration among Korean adolescents

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563216307968

Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cyberbullying and factors in cyberbullying perpetration with a national sample of 4000 adolescents selected through multi-stage cluster sampling. The respondents were 2166 boys (54.1%) and 1834 girls (45.9%) in 7th–12th grades at 24 middle and 24 high schools across South Korea. Statistical analyses of the survey data are summarized as follows. First, 34% of the respondent students were involved in cyberbullying as bullies (6.3%), victims (14.6%), or both bullies and victims (13.1%). Boys had a higher percentage of cyberbullying perpetration than girls. Second, variables for time spent on chat services and Social Network Services (SNS), the experience of being cyberbullied, and offline bullying perpetration tended to increase the probability of students being perpetrators of cyberbullying. However, the cognitive empathy variable contributed to decreased cyberbullying perpetration behaviors. Third, the variables of parental attachment and satisfaction with school life had little impact on perpetration of cyberbullying. These results were discussed to improve the understanding of the characteristics of cyberbullying among Korean adolescents and the youth population in general, while providing educators and researchers information on cyberbullying with practical consideration to its prevention.

Citation: Lee, C., & Shin, N. (2017). Prevalence of cyberbullying and predictors of cyberbullying perpetration among Korean adolescents.Computers in Human Behavior,68, 352-358. 


Author(s): Kim, J., Song, H., & Jennings, W. G.

Year: 2016

Title: A Distinct Form of Deviance or a Variation of Bullying? Examining the Developmental Pathways and Motives of Cyberbullying Compared With Traditional Bullying in South Korea

Journal: Crime & Delinquency

URL: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0011128716675358

Abstract: Cyberbullying has been subject to a debate about whether it is a subtype of traditional bullying or a distinct deviant behavior from traditional bullying. Applying a longitudinal South Korean youth sample and latent group-based trajectory modeling, the current study examines (a) an overlap of developmental trajectories between cyberbullying and traditional bullying, and (b) effects of predictors on developmental trajectory groups for both cyberbullying and traditional bullying. It is concluded that cyberbullying is close to a variation of bullying rather than a distinct deviant behavior and reported an overlap of developmental trajectories between cyberbullying and traditional bullying, and strong associations between both forms of bullying and peer-related predictors. Policy implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Citation: Kim, J., Song, H., & Jennings, W. G. (2016). A Distinct Form of Deviance or a Variation of Bullying? Examining the Developmental Pathways and Motives of Cyberbullying Compared With Traditional Bullying in South Korea.Crime & Delinquency, 0011128716675358. 


Author(s): You, S., & Lim, S. A.

Year: 2016

Title: Longitudinal predictors of cyberbullying perpetration: Evidence from Korean middle school students

Journal: Personality and Individual Differences

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886915006534

Abstract: Cyberbullying perpetration is a recent phenomenon that has become an increasingly serious social problem in Korea. This study examined the long-term effects of individual and psychological factors on cyberbullying perpetration from a sample of 3449 middle school students. Logistic regression analyses were employed in order to understand how various factors influence youth cyberbullying perpetration experiences. The findings indicated that longer use of the Internet, more previous bullying and victim experiences, a higher aggression level, and lack of self-control are associated with more cyberbullying perpetration. Implications and future directions are discussed. 

Citation: You, S., & Lim, S. A. (2016). Longitudinal predictors of cyberbullying perpetration: Evidence from Korean middle school students.Personality and Individual Differences,89, 172-176. 


Author(s): Jung, Y. E., Leventhal, B., Kim, Y. S., Park, T. W., Lee, S. H., Lee, M., … & Park, J. I.

Year: 2014

Title: Cyberbullying, problematic internet use, and psychopathologic symptoms among Korean youth

Journal: Yonsei medical journal

URL: https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php?id=10.3349/ymj.2014.55.3.826 

Abstract: To evaluate the associations between cyberbullying behaviors and problematic internet use, and to compare psychopathologic symptoms in victims, perpetrators, and victims-perpetrators of cyberbullying to those in youths who were not involved in cyberbullying. A total of 4531 youths (11-14 years of age) were recruited from elementary and middle schools. Among 4531 youths, 9.7% were involved in cyberbullying; 3.3% were only victims; 3.4% were only perpetrators; and 3.0% were victims-perpetrators. Cyberbullying behaviors were associated with problematic internet use as well as various psychopathologic symptoms. Depressive symptoms were associated with cyberbullying victimization, and rule-breaking behaviors and aggressive behaviors have relevance to cyberbullying perpetration. Greater attention needs to be paid to identify youths earlier who are involved in cyberbullying and prevent serious adverse consequences in them.

Citation: Jung, Y. E., Leventhal, B., Kim, Y. S., Park, T. W., Lee, S. H., Lee, M., … & Park, J. I. (2014). Cyberbullying, problematic internet use, and psychopathologic symptoms among Korean youth.Yonsei medical journal,55(3), 826-830.