Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Israel, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Heiman, T., Olenik-Shemesh, D., & Liberman, G.

Year: 2017

Title: Adolescent involvement in face-to-face and cyber victimization: can personal well-being mediate social-emotional behavior?

Journal: Journal of Youth Studies

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13676261.2017.1366650

Abstract: This study examined the relationships between perceived loneliness, self-efficacy, and subjective well-being as related to students’ experiences as victims of cyber and face-to-face bullying. Participants included 902 students from 18 different Israeli schools, aged 10–18 who completed self-report questionnaires. Results revealed that social loneliness fully affects the experience of cyberbullying through the mediation of well-being. Greater social loneliness decreases the perception of well-being and therefore the probability of cybervictimization increases. Furthermore, social efficacy increases personal well-being, which decreases the likelihood of experiencing cyberbullying. In addition, students experiencing social and emotional loneliness were more likely to be victims of cyber- and face-to-face bullying than students who were not lonely. Age was found to be an overall indicator for the probability of exposure to bullying and being a victim. The current findings suggested that boys who are more socially effective perceive their well-being higher than girls, and these higher perceptions lead them to a higher immunity to, or a lower experience of cyber bullying. This indirect effect is fully operated through the mediators. Boys experience greater social and emotional loneliness than girls, but perceive their well-being more highly than girls. Boys also experience more face-to-face victimization, but not more cybervictimization compared to girls.

Citation: Heiman, T., Olenik-Shemesh, D., & Liberman, G. (2017). Adolescent involvement in face-to-face and cyber victimization: can personal well-being mediate social-emotional behavior?.Journal of Youth Studies, 1-14.


Author(s): Sasson, H., & Mesch, G.

Year: 2017

Title: The role of parental mediation and peer norms on the likelihood of cyberbullying

Journal: The Journal of Genetic Psychology

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00221325.2016.1195330

Abstract: Cyberbullying is a disturbing behavior associated with the use of communication technologies among adolescents. Many studies have been devoted to the activities of cyber victims as risk factors, while others have considered parental mediation a protective factor. However, there is a paucity of studies investigating the joint contribution of parental mediation, peer norms and risky online activities to the likelihood of being bullied on the Internet. To fill this gap, we conducted a study among a representative sample of 495 sixth to eleventh grade adolescents. We measured risky behavior online with items indicating the frequency of posting personal details, sending an insulting message and meeting face-to-face with a stranger met online. Respondents reported their perceptions about their peers. attitudes toward these risky online behaviors. We also measured three types of parental mediation: active guidance, restrictive supervision and non-intervention. Binary logistic regression findings show that risky online behaviors and peer norms regarding these behaviors had a significant effect, suggesting that the likelihood of being bullied on the Internet is associated with both risky behavior online and the norms prevalent within the adolescents. peer group. Restrictive supervision had a significant effect, implying that parents who feel their children are being bullied online may increase their oversight. The results emphasize the critical role of peers and the declining influence of parents in adolescence.

Citation: Sasson, H., & Mesch, G. (2017). The role of parental mediation and peer norms on the likelihood of cyberbullying.The Journal of Genetic Psychology,178(1), 15-27.


Author(s): Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., & Eden, S.

Year: 2017

Title: Bystanders’ Behavior in Cyberbullying Episodes: Active and Passive Patterns in the Context of Personal–Socio-Emotional Factors

Journal: Journal of Interpersonal Violence

URL: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0886260515585531

Abstract: The present study explored bystanders’ behavior in cyberbullying (CB) episodes among children and youth, focusing on active and passive behavior patterns. The study examined prevalence and characteristics of bystanders’ behavior following CB episodes, and their active–passive intervention patterns in relation to personal (age, gender) and socio-emotional (self-efficacy, social support, sense of loneliness) factors. Of the 1,094 participants (ages 9-18), 497 (46.4%) reported they were bystanders to CB episodes. Of the bystanders, 55.4% were identified as having a passive pattern of behavior—they did not provide any help to cyber-victims, whereas 44.6% were identified as having an active pattern—helping the cyber-victim. In line with the “bystanders’ effect,” only 35.6% of the bystanders offered direct help to cyber-victims after witnessing CB. When studying the personal–socio-emotional differences between active and passive bystanders, it was found that the “active bystanders” are more often girls, older, have more social support from significant others, and have lower levels of emotional loneliness than bystanders in the passive group. Differences within the passive and active patterns were studied as well. A logistic regression revealed the unique contribution of each predictor to the probability of being an active bystander. It was found that gender and age predicted the probability of being an active bystander: Girls are more likely than boys, and older bystanders are more likely than younger ones, to choose an active pattern and provide help to cyber-victims. In addition, implications for CB prevention and intervention involvement programs to encourage bystanders to help cyber-victims are discussed.

Citation: Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., & Eden, S. (2017). Bystanders’ Behavior in Cyberbullying Episodes: Active and Passive Patterns in the Context of Personal–Socio-Emotional Factors.Journal of Interpersonal Violence,32(1), 23-48.


Author(s): Heiman, T., & Olenik-Shemesh, D.

Year: 2017

Title: Cyberbullying Involvement of Adolescents with Low Vision Compared to Typical Adolescents, as Related to Perceived Social Support

Journal: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10926771.2016.1228725

Abstract: This study examined adolescents with low vision (LV) compared to students without disabilities regarding their cyberbullying experiences, as related to perceived social support. Sample consisted of 407 students (61 with LV) who completed self-reported questionnaires. Findings revealed that students with LV are using the computer and the Internet as much as the typical students, but students with LV had less frequent Internet interactions with friends. Students with LV reported being more involved in cyberbullying as cybervictims, cyberperpetrators, cyberwitnesses, knowing someone and telling their online experience to another, and having lower social support compared to students without disabilities. Students with LV are more willing to report and to share their online experiences with another person. The findings add to our knowledge about students’ experiences of cyberbullying and suggest implementing effective coping strategies programs to raise the awareness of cyberbullying risky behavior.

Citation: Heiman, T., & Olenik-Shemesh, D. (2017). Cyberbullying Involvement of Adolescents with Low Vision Compared to Typical Adolescents, as Related to Perceived Social Support.Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma,26(2), 105-115.


Author(s): Lapidot-Lefler, N.

Year: 2017

Title: Cyberbullying in a multicultural society: The case of Israel

Journal: Center for Global Curriculum Studies Symposium

URL: http://digitalcommons.spu.edu/globalcurriculumsymposium/gcs2017/gcs2017_events/9/

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in cyberbullying (bystanders, victims, bullies) between Jewish and Arab adolescents in Israel. The study included 901 junior high and high school students (501 Jewish-Israelis and 400 Arab-Israelis). Precipitating Youths completed a self-report questionnaire on cyberbullying that included two-sections: personal data and cyberbullying. The questionnaire was distributed according to age groups via Facebook. Findings revealed that Jewish adolescents reported being cybervictims and cyberbystanders more than Arab adolescents, yet contrary to expectation, Arab adolescents reported being cyberbullies more than Jewish adolescents. Among Jewish adolescents, girls and boys were equally likely to be bullies and there were no significant gender differences while among Arab adolescents, girls reported higher bullying than boys. Moreover, the cultural difference was significant among girls, revealing that Jewish girls were higher than Arab girls on bystanding and victimization, while Arab girls were higher than Jewish girls on bullying in cyberspace. The cultural difference was not significant among boys. The findings will be discussed in a cultural context in a multicultural society

.

Citation: Lapidot-Lefler, Naom, “Cyberbullying in a multicultural society: The case of Israel” (2017).Center for Global Curriculum Studies Symposium. 9.


Author(s): Zerach, G.

Year: 2016

Title: Pathological narcissism, cyberbullying victimization and offending among homosexual and heterosexual participants in online dating websites.

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563215303095

Abstract: Homosexual individuals are exposed to high levels of victimization. However, no studies have examined personality risk factors for cyberbullying victimization and offending among this population. This study investigated the relationships between pathological narcissism and cyberbullying victimization and offending among homosexual and heterosexual participants in online dating websites. Participants included 347 Israeli adults who completed a series of self-reported questionnaires. Our results show that homosexual men and women reported higher levels of cyberbullying victimization relative to heterosexual women. The groups did not differ in cyberbullying offending. Furthermore, homosexual men reported higher levels of pathological narcissism grandiosity relative to homosexual women. Pathological narcissism vulnerability and grandiosity were positively related to cyberbullying victimization, but not to offending, as well as to cyberbullying dating victimization and offending. Importantly, the group (homosexual male vs. other groups) moderated the association between pathological narcissism vulnerability and cyberbullying victimization. These findings highlight the differential associations between the two facets of pathological narcissism and cyberbullying victimization and offending among homosexual men and women, and lend empirical support to the high risk for cyberbullying victimization of homosexual men with pathological narcissistic vulnerability traits who are actively participating in the online dating sphere.

Citation: Zerach, G. (2016). Pathological narcissism, cyberbullying victimization and offending among homosexual and heterosexual participants in online dating websites. Computers in Human Behavior, 57, 292-299.

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Author(s): Lapidot-Lefler, N., & Dolev-Cohen, M.

Year: 2015

Title: Comparing cyberbullying and school bullying among school students: prevalence, gender, and grade level differences.

Journal: Social psychology of education

URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11218-014-9280-8

Abstract: Recent technological developments have added cyberspace as part of adolescents’ social milieu. Bullying, which is prevalent in adolescents’ social environment, also takes place in cyberspace, although it is believed to have a more potent and harmful effect. A study of cyberbullying and FtF bullying could elucidate critical implications for children, educators, and policy makers. The present study examined cyberbullying and school bullying among 465 junior-high and high-school students (136 boys and 329 girls) in Israel, through an online survey. Findings revealed that the phenomenon of cyberbullying is less prevalent than school bullying. In the majority of cases in cyberspace, the identity of the cyber bully was known to the victim and the audience. According to the findings, in cyberspace, boys tended to bully more often than did girls; no correlation was found between gender and victim or gender and audience. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of online communication theory.

Citation: Lapidot-Lefler, N., & Dolev-Cohen, M. (2015). Comparing cyberbullying and school bullying among school students: prevalence, gender, and grade level differences. Social psychology of education, 18(1), 1-16.


Author(s): Tarablus, T., Heiman, T., & Olenik-Shemesh, D.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyber bullying among teenagers in Israel: An examination of cyber bullying, traditional bullying, and socioemotional functioning.

Journal: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10926771.2015.1049763#.V1r-a2bQto4

Abstract: In this study, the relationships between cyber bullying and involvement in traditional bullying, with reference to social support and gender differences, was examined. Social support plays an important role in empowering victims of cyber bullying and has a significant influence on children and teenagers’ well-being. A sample made up of 458 Israeli junior high students (242 female, 216 male) in the age range of 11 to 13 completed 4 questionnaires. Results indicated that there is an overlap between involvement in cyber bullying and involvement in traditional bullying. The findings indicate that girls were more likely to be cyber victims than boys and that boys were more likely to be cyber bullies than girls. Examination of the relationships between gender and social support variables such as friends, family, and others, shows that girls who were cyber victims reported having more support in all 3 types than cyber bullied boys. These findings can serve as a basis for prevention and intervention programs to cope with cyber bullying.

Citation: Tarablus, T., Heiman, T., & Olenik-Shemesh, D. (2015). Cyber bullying among teenagers in Israel: An examination of cyber bullying, traditional bullying, and socioemotional functioning. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 24(6), 707-720.


Author(s): Heiman, T., Olenik-Shemesh, D., & Eden, S.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyberbullying involvement among students with ADHD: relation to loneliness, self-efficacy and social support.

Journal: European Journal of Special Needs Education

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08856257.2014.943562

Abstract: Cyberbullying is defined as an intentional online act via electronic media, to harm, embarrass and/or humiliate another person. As adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at a higher risk in being involved in bullying behaviour as perpetrators or victims, the main purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of their cyber experience and its impact on loneliness, perceived self-efficacy and social support. The study population included 140 adolescent students with ADHD taking part in general classes and 332 students without disabilities, all of whom completed four self-report questionnaires (cyberbullying, perceived feelings of loneliness, self-efficacy and social support). The findings show no significant differences between students with or without ADHD regarding the time spent on the net and their perceived usage expertise. Most participants with ADHD were familiar with the internet and spent a similar amount of time surfing as the adolescents without ADHD. Results revealed significant differences between the student groups (ADHD/Non-ADHD) and some of the social-emotional measures: students with ADHD who were cybervictims and students with ADHD who were cyberwitnesses reported on greater feelings of emotional loneliness and a lower belief in their social self-efficacy than the non-ADHD students. Furthermore, ADHD student cyberwitnesses also reported on feelings of greater social loneliness. Findings revealed that girls were significantly more often cybervictims than boys. However, boys reported on significantly more involvement as cyberperpetrators than girls.

Citation: Heiman, T., Olenik-Shemesh, D., & Eden, S. (2015). Cyberbullying involvement among students with ADHD: relation to loneliness, self-efficacy and social support. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 30(1), 15-29.


Author(s): Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., & Rabin, E.

Year: 2014

Title: Virtual Anti-Bullying Village Project for Coping with Bullying and Cyberbullying within a 3d Virtual Learning Environment: Evaluation Research.

Journal:

URL: http://academic-pub.org/ojs/index.php/IJCSE/article/view/1147

Abstract: The current study aims to evaluate the implementation of a unique educational project — The Virtual Anti-Bullying Village for Kids and Teens that was designed and operated by the European Commission. A 3D virtual environment as an innovative, international project for adolescents, focused on knowledge acquisition and new ways of coping with bullying and cyberbullying. Sixty seventh graders (Israeli adolescents) completed five questionnaires before and after the project to assess its impacts regarding cyberbullying and socio-emotional variables. They evaluated the project as important, enjoyable, and increasing their knowledge about cyberbullying, but expressed a need for more practical tools for coping. At the end of the project, the control group reported more cyberbullying experiences, as well as a decrease in social support, whereas the research group reported no changes in cyberbullying experiences and in socio-emotional aspects.

Citation: Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., & Rabin, E. (2014). Virtual Anti-Bullying Village Project for Coping with Bullying and Cyberbullying within a 3d Virtual Learning Environment: Evaluation Research. International Journal of Cyber Society and Education, 7(2), 97.


Author(s): Bouhnik, D., & Mor, D.

Year: 2014

Title: Gender differences in the moral judgment and behavior of Israeli adolescents in the internet environment.

Journal: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/asi.22979/full

Abstract: This study explored differences between genders regarding adolescents’ behavioral characteristics and moral judgment in the Internet environment. A questionnaire was administered to 1,048 students in the 7th to 11th grades in six different schools, one class in each grade. The questionnaire included personal data, characteristics of Internet interaction patterns, moral dilemmas in daily life, and moral dilemmas in the virtual environment. No significant differences were found between the genders regarding the age usage of the Internet began, Internet experience, and average daily hours of Internet use. We found that boys prefer, more than girls, to surf at school and in Internet cafes. Girls tend to use the Internet more for doing homework and blogs than boys, whereas boys tend to play Internet games more than girls. Gender differences were found regarding immoral behavior. Boys were involved more frequently than girls in behaviors such as cyberbullying, plagiarism, impersonation, and downloading music and movies illegally from the Internet. A correlation was found between gender and moral judgment. Although both boys and girls made relatively little “humane judgment” in the Internet environment, girls tended to make “humane judgment” more frequently than boys. In the Internet environment, boys tended to make “absence of judgment” evaluations more than girls. Girls tended, relatively more, toward “normative judgment” that reflects adherence to peer-group conventions with minimal reflexivity.

Citation: Bouhnik, D., & Mor, D. (2014). Gender differences in the moral judgment and behavior of Israeli adolescents in the internet environment. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 65(3), 551-559.


Author(s): Eden, S., Heiman, T., & Olenik‐Shemesh, D.

Year: 2013

Title: Teachers’ perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying.

Journal: British journal of educational technology

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01363.x/full

Abstract: Schools and teachers nowadays face new difficulties and challenges as a result of the fast growth of cyberbullying. The aim of the study is to examine the perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, as well as the needs, of a professionally diverse group of teachers. Three-hundred and twenty-eight teachers (88.4% female, 11.6% male) from different types of schools and professional foci were randomly selected and completed a cyberbullying questionnaire regarding their perceptions of cyberbullying and about their personal experiences in relation to cyberbullying. They also provided background information. Findings indicate that teachers noted that cyberbullying is a problem in their school, suggesting that urgent attention be paid to three aspects: policy making, enhancing awareness of the school team and coping strategies for parents. About half the teachers reported that students complain of harassment through the mobile phone and Internet, and some teachers were themselves cyberbullied. It was found that the teachers’ gender, education level and the age of the students they taught affected their level of concern about cyberbullying, and therefore how credible they found the school’s commitment to act on it. Female teachers expressed more concern than male teachers, as did teachers of younger children. Special education teachers were more concerned than mainstream teachers and were more likely to believe that the cyberbullying must be confronted. The results contribute to our understanding of the teachers’ perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, which could serve as a basis for developing policy guidelines in schools as well as establishing programs for school teachers to cope with cyberbullying.

Citation: Eden, S., Heiman, T., & Olenik‐Shemesh, D. (2013). Teachers’ perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying. British journal of educational technology, 44(6), 1036-1052.


Author(s): Heiman, T., & Olenik-Shemesh, D.

Year: 2013

Title: Cyberbullying experience and gender differences among adolescents in different educational settings

Journal: Journal of learning disabilities

URL: http://ldx.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/06/17/0022219413492855.abstract

Abstract: Cyberbullying refers to a negative activity aimed at deliberate and repeated harm through the use of a variety of electronic media. This study examined the Internet behavior patterns and gender differences among students with learning disabilities who attended general education and special education classes, their involvement in cyberbullying, and the relationships among being cyberbullied, their responses, and their coping strategies. The sample consisted of 149 students with learning disabilities (LD) attending general education classes, 116 students with comorbid LD attending special education classes, and 242 typically achieving students. All the students, studying in middle and high schools, completed a self-report cyberbullying questionnaire. Findings indicate that although no significant differences emerged in the amount of surfing hours and students’ expertise in the use of the Internet, students attending special education classes are more likely to be cybervictims and cyberperpetrators; girls are more likely to be cybervictims, whereas boys are more likely to be cyberperpetrators. These results contribute to our understanding of students’ involvement in cyberbullying and can serve as a basis for developing preventive programs as well as intervention programs for students and for educational school teams.

Citation: Heiman, T., & Olenik-Shemesh, D. (2013). Cyberbullying experience and gender differences among adolescents in different educational settings. Journal of learning disabilities, 0022219413492855.


Author(s): Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., & Eden, S.

Year: 2012

Title: Cyberbullying victimisation in adolescence: Relationships with loneliness and depressive mood.

Journal: Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13632752.2012.704227

Abstract: Cyberbullying is deliberate, aggressive activity carried out through digital means. Cybervictimisation in adolescence may be related to negative psychosocial variables such as loneliness and depressive mood. The purpose of the present study, the first of its kind in Israel, was to examine the association between adolescent cybervictimisation and two socio-emotional variables: loneliness and depressive mood. The sample consisted of 242 Israeli adolescents, aged 13–16 years, who completed questionnaires regarding Internet use, cyberbullying, traditional bullying, loneliness and depressive mood. In total, 16.5% of the participants reported being cybervictims and 32.5% reported knowing someone who was cybervictimised. The results revealed a relationship between cybervictimisation and loneliness (social, emotional and general) as well as depressive mood. A logistic hierarchical regression found that loneliness, gender and depressive mood each explained some variance in cybervictimisation in adolescents. As an anchor for comparison, and in order to shed light on the findings, results are presented in comparison to traditional bullying. The results make a contribution to national and international cyberbullying research and broaden the knowledge about potential risk factors for cybervictimisation.

Citation: Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., & Eden, S. (2012). Cyberbullying victimisation in adolescence: Relationships with loneliness and depressive mood. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 17(3-4), 361-374.