Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Hungary, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Authors: Zsila, Á., Urban, R., Demetrovics, Z.

Year: 2019

Title: Gender Differences in the Association Between Cyberbullying Victimization and Perpetration: The Role of Anger Rumination and Traditional Bullying Experiences

Journal: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction

URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-018-9926-4

Abstract: Studies investigating the similarities and differences in traditional bullying and cyberbullying experiences have demonstrated considerable gender differences concerning its determinants. The aim of the present study was to provide further evidence for the differential role of determinants for males and females by investigating the moderating role of traditional bullying and anger rumination in the relationship of past cyberbullying victimization and recent cyberbullying perpetration in respect to gender. A total of 1500 Hungarian adolescents and adults (57.9% male, Mage = 28.9 years, SD = 8.7) completed an online survey on bullying experiences. Results indicated that males were more likely than females to engage in cyberbullying when they had been previously bullied online. Furthermore, low anger rumination elevated the risk of perpetration among male cyberbullying victims, while repeated victimization in traditional bullying increased the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among females. These results underline the importance of considering gender differences in intervention efforts against bullying.

Citation: Zsila, Á., Urbán, R., Griffiths, M. D., & Demetrovics, Z. (2018). Gender Differences in the Association Between Cyberbullying Victimization and Perpetration: The Role of Anger Rumination and Traditional Bullying Experiences. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 17(5), 1252–1267. doi: 10.1007/s11469-018-9893-9