Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Austria, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Gradinger, Petra; Strohmeier, Dagmar; Spiel, Christiane

Year: 2017

Title: Parents’ and teachers’ opinions on bullying and cyberbullying prevention: The relevance of their own children or students’ involvement.

Journal: Journal of Psychology

URL: https://doi.org/10.1027/2151-2604/a000278

Abstract: The goals of the present study were (1) to examine parents’ and teachers’ opinions on bullying and cyberbullying prevention, and (2) to investigate whether the involvement of their children or students in bullying affects their opinions. Altogether, 959 adults (466 parents, 493 teachers) reported on their opinions. More than 95% of parents and teachers regarded bullying as an important topic. Cyberbullying was seen as the least serious form and physical bullying as the most serious one. Ninety-five percent of parents and 90% of teachers stated that they would accept a bullying prevention program; 61% of parents and 75% of teachers were willing to actively participate in bullying prevention; 34% of parents and 66% of teachers reported that their own children or students were victims of bullying. This involvement moderated the teachers’ opinions. Teachers of students affected by bullying rated verbal and cyberbullying as more serious, accepted prevention programs more readily and were more willing to actively participate in a program compared to teachers whose students were not involved.

Citation: Gradinger, P., Strohmeier, D., & Spiel, C. (2017). Parents’ and teachers’ opinions on bullying and cyberbullying prevention: The relevance of their own children’s or students’ involvement. Zeitschrift für Psychologie, 225(1), 76–84.


Year: 2016

Title: Effectiveness and sustainability of the ViSC Social Competence Program to prevent cyberbullying and cyber‐victimization: Class and individual level moderators

Journal: Aggressive Behavior Special Issue: School‐Based Interventions Against Cyberbullying in Adolescence

URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21631

Abstract: We investigated whether the general anti‐bullying program ViSC sustainably prevents cyberbullying and cyber‐victimization. A longitudinal randomized control group design was used to examine (i) program effectiveness immediately after a 1 year implementation phase and (ii) sustainable program effects 6 months later taking several moderators on the class level (class climate and ethnic diversity) and on the individual level (gender, age, internet usage, traditional bullying/victimization) into account. Effectiveness (e.g., the change between waves 2 and 1) was examined in 2,042 students (47.6% girls), aged 11.7 years (SD = 0.88) enrolled in 18 schools and 103 classes. Sustainability (e.g., the change between waves 3 and 2) was examined in a sub‐sample of 6 schools and 35 classes comprising 659 students. The self‐assessment multiple‐item scales showed longitudinal and multiple group invariance. Factor scores were extracted to compute difference scores for effectiveness (Posttest minus Pretest) and sustainability (Follow‐up test minus Posttest) for cyberbullying and cyber‐victimization. Multilevel Modeling was applied to examine (i) the effectiveness and (ii) the sustainability of the ViSC intervention controlling for several individual and class level variables. Controlling for covariates, it was demonstrated that the ViSC program is effective in preventing cyberbullying and cyber‐victimization and that the effects are sustainable after 6 months. The consequences for cyberbullying prevention are discussed.

Citation: Gradinger, P., Yanagida, T., Strohmeier, D., & Spiel, C. (2016). Effectiveness and sustainability of the ViSC Social Competence Program to prevent cyberbullying and cyber‐victimization: Class and individual level moderators. Aggressive behavior, 42(2), 181-193.


Author(s): Gradinger, P., Yanagida, T., Strohmeier, D., & Spiel, C.

Year: 2015

Title: Prevention of cyberbullying and cyber victimization: Evaluation of the ViSC Social Competence Program.

Journal: Journal of School Violence

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15388220.2014.963231

Abstract: It is well-documented that cyberbullying and victimization co-occur with traditional forms indicating that they share similar mechanisms. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the general antibullying program ViSC might also be effective in tackling these new forms of bullying. A longitudinal randomized control group design has been applied to examine the program effectiveness in 18 schools. In total, 2,042 students in Grades 5 to 7 (47.3% girls) aged 11.7 (SD = 0.9) attending 105 classes participated in the study. Utilizing a multiple group bivariate latent change score model controlling for traditional aggression, traditional victimization, and age, results demonstrate program effectiveness for cyberbullying (latent d = 0.39) and cyber victimization (latent d = 0.29) indicating that these behaviors reflect a systemic (school) problem.

Citation: Gradinger, P., Yanagida, T., Strohmeier, D., & Spiel, C. (2015). Prevention of cyberbullying and cyber victimization: Evaluation of the ViSC Social Competence Program. Journal of School Violence, 14(1), 87-110.


Author(s): Gradinger, P., Strohmeier, D., & Spiel, C.

Year: 2009

Title: Traditional bullying and cyberbullying: Identification of risk groups for adjustment problems.

Journal: Zeitschrift für Psychologie/Journal of Psychology

URL: http://econtent.hogrefe.com/doi/abs/10.1027/0044-3409.217.4.205

Abstract: We investigated the co-occurrence of traditional bullying, cyberbullying, traditional victimization, and cybervictimization, and analyzed whether students belonging to particular groups of bullies (e.g., traditional, cyber, or both), victims (e.g., traditional, cyber, or both), and bully-victims differed regarding adjustment. Seven hundred sixty-one adolescents (49% boys) aged 14–19 years (M = 15.6 years) were surveyed. More students than expected by chance were totally uninvolved, more students were traditional bully-victims, and more students were combined bully-victims (traditional and cyber). The highest risks for poor adjustment (high scores in reactive and instrumental aggression, depressive, and somatic symptoms) were observed in students who were identified as combined bully-victims (traditional and cyber). In addition gender differences were examined.

Citation: Gradinger, P., Strohmeier, D., & Spiel, C. (2009). Traditional bullying and cyberbullying: Identification of risk groups for adjustment problems. Zeitschrift für Psychologie/Journal of Psychology, 217(4), 205-213.