Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Portugal, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Coelho, V. A., Sousa, V., Marchante, M., Brás, P., & Romão, A. M.

Year: 2016

Title: Bullying and cyberbullying in Portugal: Validation of a questionnaire and analysis of prevalence.

Journal: School Psychology International

URL: http://spi.sagepub.com/content/37/3/223.short

Abstract: This study aims to validate the Bullying and Cyberbullying Behaviors Questionnaire, to examine the prevalence of bullying and victimization behaviors in Portuguese middle school students, and to analyse the differences in victimization and bullying between genders and across school grades. The questionnaire is composed of 36 items, allowing for the measurement of the prevalence of bullying and cyberbullying, and was completed by 1039 sixth to eighth graders (Mage = 12.02; SD = 1.36) from six public middle schools in the district of Lisbon. The questionnaire presented acceptable psychometrics properties, except for the victims of cyberbullying scale where there is an item that needs to be rewritten. Bullying prevalence (10.1% victims and 6.1% aggressors) is among the lowest internationally. Victimization prevalence was homogeneous between genders, but boys reported aggressive behaviors more frequently. The percentage of victims decreased across school grades. The present questionnaire is adequate for use in the assessment of bullying and cyberbullying with middle school students. Bullying prevention programs should take into account the need to raise teacher awareness of bullying and cyberbullying.

Citation: Coelho, V. A., Sousa, V., Marchante, M., Brás, P., & Romão, A. M. (2016). Bullying and cyberbullying in Portugal: Validation of a questionnaire and analysis of prevalence. School Psychology International, 37(3), 223-239.


Author(s): Ferreira, P. C., Simão, A. V., Ferreira, A., Souza, S., & Francisco, S.

Year: 2016

Title: Student bystander behavior and cultural issues in cyberbullying: When actions speak louder than words

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563216301170

Abstract: This study aims to investigate whether student bystander interventions can influence the relationship between being a bystander of a cyberbullying incident and being the victim or the aggressor. Another aim is to understand the specific behavior presented by students bystanders, namely whether they noticed incidents of cyberbullying and interpreted these events as an emergency and which actions they determined as being appropriate in providing assistance. Following a cross-cultural perspective to reach these aims, a total of 788 Portuguese and Brazilian college students answered to the Cyberbullying Inventory for College Students. Moderation analysis revealed that intervening moderated the relationship between being the bystander of cyberbullying and being the victim and/or aggressor. A three-way interaction showed that this relationship was stronger in Brazilian students, revealing that the bystanders who were inactive were more likely to also become a victim or an aggressor themselves, whereas those who intervened were less likely to become a victim or an aggressor. Implications for future research and interventive action are discussed.

Citation: Ferreira, P. C., Simão, A. V., Ferreira, A., Souza, S., & Francisco, S. (2016). Student bystander behavior and cultural issues in cyberbullying: When actions speak louder than words. Computers in Human Behavior, 60, 301-311.


Author(s): O’Neill, B., & Dinh, T.

Year: 2015

Title: Mobile technologies and the incidence of cyberbullying in Seven European Countries: findings from Net children go mobile.

Journal: Societies

URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4698/5/2/384/htm

Abstract: The harmful effects of bullying and harassment on children have long been of concern to parents, educators, and policy makers. The online world presents a new environment in which vulnerable children can be victimized and a space where perpetrators find new ways to perform acts of harassment. While online bullying is often considered to be an extension of persistent offline behavior, according to EU Kids Online (2011), the most common form of bullying is in person, face-to-face. With the rise in use of mobile Internet technologies, this balance is changing. Increased levels of use and more time spent online accessed through a variety of devices has increased children’s exposure to a range of online risks, including cyberbullying. This article presents the findings of the Net Children Go Mobile project, a cross-national study of children aged 9–16 in seven European countries. The research builds on the work of EU Kids Online and supports the identification of new trends in children’s online experiences of risk and safety. The study finds that while overall levels of bullying have remained relatively static, levels of online bullying have increased, particularly among younger teens. The relationship between cyberbullying and the use of mobile Internet technologies is examined and factors contributing to increased levels of cyberbullying are highlighted.

Citation: O’Neill, B., & Dinh, T. (2015). Mobile technologies and the incidence of cyberbullying in Seven European Countries: findings from Net children go mobile. Societies, 5(2), 384-398.


Author(s): Jäger, T., Amado, J., Matos, A., & Pessoa, T.

Year: 2010

Title: Analysis of Experts’ and Trainers’ Views on Cyberbullying.

Journal: Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling

URL: http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=866564575453467;res=IELHEA

Abstract: Partners from nine European countries developed a cyberbullying training manual for the benefit of trainers working with parents, school staff and young people.1 The development of the training manual built on a two-level qualitative research process that combined elements of the Delphi method and online focus groups. The two studies outlined in this article aimed to assess trainers’ and experts’ views on the problem of cyberbullying while also gathering insight in relation to their preferences in terms of a training manual. This article outlines the main outcomes of a content analysis of experts’ and trainers’ views. According to experts and trainers, the sources of cyberbullying were specifically related to new technical developments and new patterns of usage, a lack of media literacy and media education, and the lack of appropriate laws, control and reporting mechanisms. Approaches for tackling cyberbullying suggested by experts and trainers included the provision of enhanced information on ICT and e-safety, adequate rules, monitoring mechanisms and sanctions. Furthermore a range of approaches targeting children and young people, parents and other adults, schools as well as approaches run by authorities and IT providers were suggested. In terms of the elements and style of a training manual, experts and trainers emphasised that it should be practically oriented, and that elements like narratives, case examples or video clips would be vital for the implementation of training.

Citation: Jäger, T., Amado, J., Matos, A., & Pessoa, T. (2010). Analysis of Experts’ and Trainers’ Views on Cyberbullying. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 20(02), 169-181.