Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Taiwan, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Chang, F. C., Chiu, C. H., Miao, N. F., Chen, P. H., Lee, C. M., & Chiang, J. T.

Year: 2016

Title: Predictors of unwanted exposure to online pornography and online sexual solicitation of youth.

Journal: Journal of health psychology

URL: http://hpq.sagepub.com/content/21/6/1107.short

Abstract: This study examined factors associated with the unwanted exposure to online pornography and unwanted online sexual solicitation victimization and perpetration of youth in Taiwan. A total of 2315 students from 26 high schools were assessed in the 10th grade, with follow-up performed in the 11th grade. Self-administered questionnaires were collected. Multivariate analysis results indicated that higher levels of online game use, pornography media exposure, Internet risk behaviors, depression, and cyberbullying experiences predicted online sexual solicitation victimization, while higher levels of Internet chat room use, pornography media exposure, Internet risk behaviors, cyberbullying experiences, and offline sexual harassment predicted online sexual solicitation perpetration.

Citation: Chang, F. C., Chiu, C. H., Miao, N. F., Chen, P. H., Lee, C. M., & Chiang, J. T. (2016). Predictors of unwanted exposure to online pornography and online sexual solicitation of youth. Journal of health psychology, 21(6), 1107-1118.


Author(s): Chan, H. C. O., & Wong, D. S.

Year: 2015

Title: Traditional school bullying and cyberbullying in Chinese societies: Prevalence and a review of the whole-school intervention approach.

Journal: Aggression and Violent Behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1359178915000725

Abstract: Traditional school bullying and cyberbullying have been a growing concern globally. In this review, we first review the prevalence of traditional school bullying and cyberbullying in selected major Chinese societies, namely the Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau. Empirical findings on the characteristics of bullying perpetrators, victims, and the offense circumstances are described. As an intervention strategy, we then comprehensively review the whole-school intervention approach in tackling traditional school bullying and cyberbullying. Its origin, key components, and different factors that may contribute to the effective implementation of the whole-school approach in preventing and reducing bullying behaviors among children and adolescents are discussed. We conclude the review with potential implications for the application of this intervention approach in tackling traditional school bullying and cyberbullying in Chinese societies.

Citation: Chan, H. C. O., & Wong, D. S. (2015). Traditional school bullying and cyberbullying in Chinese societies: Prevalence and a review of the whole-school intervention approach. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 98-108.


Author(s): Chen, L. M., Cheng, W., & Ho, H. C.

Year: 2015

Title: Perceived severity of school bullying in elementary schools based on participants’ roles.

Journal: Educational Psychology

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01443410.2013.860220?journalCode=cedp20

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived severity of school bullying among participants with different roles (victims, bullies, bullies/victims and non-involved individuals) and to determine whether interactions between type of bullying and participant roles exist. Two Olweus-like global items and a revised School Bullying Severity Scale for elementary students were used in this study. A total of 1816 valid surveys completed by students in grades 5 and 6 (mean age = 11.5, SD = 0.84) were collected. Data were analysed using a mixed-model two-way ANOVA. The results revealed a significant main effect of type of bullying. Physical and verbal bullying were perceived as more severe than relational and cyberbullying. A significant two-way interaction between bullying category and participant role was also identified. Bullies did not perceive the four types of victimisation behaviours differently, whereas victims and bullies/victims both rated physical victimisation as most severe and cyber-victimisation as least severe. However, effect sizes were small. Implications for bullying prevention and intervention are discussed.

Citation: Chen, L. M., Cheng, W., & Ho, H. C. (2015). Perceived severity of school bullying in elementary schools based on participants’ roles. Educational Psychology, 35(4), 484-496.


Author(s): Yen, C. F., Chou, W. J., Liu, T. L., Ko, C. H., Yang, P., & Hu, H. F.

Year: 2014

Title: Cyberbullying among male adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: prevalence, correlates, and association with poor mental health status.

Journal: Research in developmental disabilities

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891422214003874

Abstract: The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence rates and multilevel correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators among male adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Taiwan. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were also examined. The experiences of cyberbullying victimization and perpetration in 251 male adolescents with ADHD were assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were examined using multiple regression analysis. A total of 48 (19.1%) and 36 (14.3%) participants reported that they were cyberbullying victims or perpetrators, respectively. Those who had increased age and a higher parental occupational socioeconomic status, and reported more severe traditional passive bullying victimization were more likely to be cyberbullying victims. Those who had increased age and combined-type ADHD, and reported lower BAS reward responsiveness, more severe Internet addiction and more severe traditional passive bullying perpetration were more likely to be cyberbullying perpetrators. Cyberbullying victims reported more severe depression and suicidality than those who were not cyberbullying victims. A high proportion of male adolescents with ADHD are involved in cyberbullying. Clinicians, educational professionals, and parents of adolescents should monitor the possibility of cyberbullying involvement among male adolescents with ADHD who exhibit the cyberbullying correlates identified in this study.

Citation: Yen, C. F., Chou, W. J., Liu, T. L., Ko, C. H., Yang, P., & Hu, H. F. (2014). Cyberbullying among male adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: prevalence, correlates, and association with poor mental health status. Research in developmental disabilities, 35(12), 3543-3553.


Author(s): Yang, S. C., Lin, C. Y., & Chen, A. S.

Year: 2014

Title: A Study of Taiwanese Teens’ Traditional and Cyberbullying Behaviors

Journal: Journal of Educational Computing Research

URL: http://jec.sagepub.com/content/50/4/525.short

Abstract: This study examined several types of teen behaviors, specifically bullying, being bullied, and witnessing bullying, and analyzed teens’ judgments of the seriousness of the bullying. A Bullying Behaviors Scale (BBS) was designed to investigate both traditional bullying (TB) and cyberbullying (CB) behaviors among teens in grades 5 through 11. The study also explored the prevalence of both types of bullying according to gender and grade. Descriptive statistics revealed that TB and CB were moderately prevalent among teens, with CB occurring less frequently than traditional bullying. Verbal bullying was the most common form of TB for victims, bullies, and bystanders, followed by relational and physical bullying. Bullying events were found to be more prevalent among boys than girls and were more frequently experienced by older children than younger children for almost all types of TB and CB. The only exception was physical bullying, whose victims tended to be younger. The study concludes by discussing suggestions for further research.

Citation: Yang, S. C., Lin, C. Y., & Chen, A. S. (2014). A Study of Taiwanese Teens’ Traditional and Cyberbullying Behaviors. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 50(4), 525-552.


Author(s): Chang, F. C., Lee, C. M., Chiu, C. H., Hsi, W. Y., Huang, T. F., & Pan, Y. C.

Year: 2013

Title: Relationships Among Cyberbullying, School Bullying, and Mental Health in Taiwanese Adolescents

Journal: Journal of school health

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23586891

Abstract: Background: This study examined the relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in adolescents.

Citation: Chang, F. C., Lee, C. M., Chiu, C. H., Hsi, W. Y., Huang, T. F., & Pan, Y. C. (2013). Relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in Taiwanese adolescents. Journal of school health, 83(6), 454-462.


Author(s): Huang, Y. Y., & Chou, C.

Year: 2013

Title: Revisiting cyberbullying: Perspectives from Taiwanese teachers

Journal: Computers & Education

URL: https://ir.nctu.edu.tw/bitstream/11536/21701/1/000317369900021.pdf

Abstract: Cyberbullying among students has received extensive attention from researchers and educators. Most research is, however, based on student reports while teachers’ perceptions of this aggressive behavior among students have rarely been studied. We surveyed 2821 Taiwanese teachers on their perceptions of cyberbullying among students, including the types and tools, the ability to remain anonymous, students’ responses, and their own practices of handling cyberbullying incidents at school. The results showed that teachers believed that the circulation of embarrassing pictures and videos was the most prevalent type of cyberbullying but that instant messaging was the most frequently used tool. Our findings also revealed teachers’ tendency of overestimating students’ willingness to report cyberbullying. The students’ grade level that the teachers taught and whether they take on administrative duties were found to influence their perceptions of student cyberbullying. We found that teachers were not confident to handle cyberbullying incidents and we suggest that anti-cyberbullying training be included in teacher education.

Citation: Huang, Y. Y., & Chou, C. (2013). Revisiting cyberbullying: Perspectives from Taiwanese teachers. Computers & Education, 63, 227-239.


Author(s): Lee, M. S., Zi-Pei, W., Svanström, L., & Dalal, K.

Year: 2013

Title: Cyber bullying prevention: Intervention in Taiwan

Journal: PloS one

URL: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0064031

Abstract: Background:This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of the cyber bullying prevention WebQuest course implementation.

Citation: Lee, M. S., Zi-Pei, W., Svanström, L., & Dalal, K. (2013). Cyber bullying prevention: Intervention in Taiwan. PloS one, 8(5), e64031.


Author(s): Huang, Y. Y., & Chou, C.

Year: 2010

Title: An analysis of multiple factors of cyberbullying among junior high school students in Taiwan.

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: https://ir.nctu.edu.tw/bitstream/11536/14084/1/000282155200045.pdf

Abstract: Cyberbullying, as a serious kind of repeated, intentional, and harmful aggressive behavior, cannot be ignored. In light of the limited studies and inconsistent findings on the matter, this study explores cyberbullying’s frequency and other factors (gender, academic achievement, types of technologies used, and anonymity) relevant to both the issue itself and the East Asian context. The interrelationship of different roles (bullies, victims, and bystanders) in cyberbullying is also examined. A survey was conducted with 545 Taiwan junior high school students. The results indicate that male students were more likely to bully others in cyberspace and that cyberbullying was not affected by one’s level of academic achievement. Regarding the various technologies and various country-specific cyberbullying forms pertinent to technology users, instant messenger (IM) users experienced significantly more cyberbullying than users of other technologies. The survey results also indicate that the anonymity of cyberbullying was not a pertinent factor. The study found that the dominant attitude toward cyberbullying was indifference, raising alarms about the lack of cyberbullying prevention. Peers, who were the people most teenagers would likely turn to when experiencing cyberbullying, usually took no action because of their tendency to avoid conflicts and to maintain group harmony. In its interpretation of the findings, this study emphasizes Taiwan’s context, including Confucian philosophy.

Citation: Huang, Y. Y., & Chou, C. (2010). An analysis of multiple factors of cyberbullying among junior high school students in Taiwan. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(6), 1581-1590.