Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Poland, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Schultze-Krumbholz, A., Göbel, K., Scheithauer, H., Brighi, A., Guarini, A., Tsorbatzoudis, H., … & Casas, J. A.

Year: 2015

Title: A comparison of classification approaches for cyberbullying and traditional bullying using data from six European countries.

Journal: Journal of School Violence

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15388220.2014.961067

Abstract: In recently published studies on cyberbullying, students are frequently categorized into distinct (cyber)bully and (cyber)victim clusters based on theoretical assumptions and arbitrary cut-off scores adapted from traditional bullying research. The present study identified involvement classes empirically using latent class analysis (LCA), to compare the classification of cyber- and traditional bullying and to compare LCA and the conventional approach. Participants were 6,260 students (M = 14.8 years, SD = 1.6; 49.1% male) from six European countries. LCA resulted in three classes for cyberbullying and four classes for traditional bullying. Cyber- and traditional bullying differed from each other, as did LCA and the conventional approach. Country, age, and gender differences were found. Implications for the field of traditional and cyberbullying research are discussed.

Citation: Schultze-Krumbholz, A., Göbel, K., Scheithauer, H., Brighi, A., Guarini, A., Tsorbatzoudis, H., … & Casas, J. A. (2015). A comparison of classification approaches for cyberbullying and traditional bullying using data from six European countries. Journal of School Violence, 14(1), 47-65.


Author(s): Del Rey, R., Casas, J. A., Ortega-Ruiz, R., Schultze-Krumbholz, A., Scheithauer, H., Smith, P., … & Guarini, A.

Year: 2015

Title: Structural validation and cross-cultural robustness of the European Cyberbullying Intervention Project Questionnaire.

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563215002630

Abstract: During the last decade, cyberbullying has become an increasing concern which has been addressed by diverse theoretical and methodological approaches. As a result there is a debate about its nature and rigorously validated assessment instruments have not yet been validated. In this context, in the present study an instrument composed of 22 items representing the different types of behaviours and actions that define cyberbullying has been structurally validated and its cross-cultural robustness has been calculated for the two main dimensions: cyber-victimization and cyber-aggression. To this end, 5679 secondary school students from six European countries (Spain, Germany, Italy, Poland, United Kingdom, and Greece) were surveyed through this self-report questionnaire which was designed based on previously existing instruments and the most relevant conceptual elements. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted and the global internal consistency was computed for the instrument and its two dimensions. Identical factor structures were found across all of the six subsamples. The results contribute to existing research by providing an instrument, the European Cyberbullying Intervention Project Questionnaire, which has been structurally validated in a wide sample from six different countries and that is useful to evaluate psycho-educative interventions against cyberbullying.

Citation: Del Rey, R., Casas, J. A., Ortega-Ruiz, R., Schultze-Krumbholz, A., Scheithauer, H., Smith, P., … & Guarini, A. (2015). Structural validation and cross-cultural robustness of the European Cyberbullying Intervention Project Questionnaire. Computers in Human Behavior, 50, 141-147.


Author(s): Tsitsika, A., Janikian, M., Wójcik, S., Makaruk, K., Tzavela, E., Tzavara, C., … & Richardson, C.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyberbullying victimization prevalence and associations with internalizing and externalizing problems among adolescents in six European countries.

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074756321500343X

Abstract: Cyberbullying victimization is an important adolescent health issue. The cross-national study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cyber victimization and associated internalizing, externalizing and academic problems among adolescents in six European countries. A cross-sectional school-based study of 14–17 year-old adolescents (N = 10,930; F/M: 5719/5211; mean age 15.8 ± 0.7 years) was conducted in Spain, Poland, the Netherlands, Romania, Iceland and Greece. In total, 21.4% of adolescents reported cyber victimization in the past 12 months. Reports were more frequent among girls than boys (23.9% vs. 18.5%), and among the older adolescents compared to the younger ones (24.2% vs. 19.7%). The prevalence was highest in Romania and Greece (37.3% and 26.8%) and lowest in Spain and Iceland (13.3% and 13.5%). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that cyber victimization was more frequent among adolescents using the internet and social networking sites for two or more hours daily. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that externalizing, internalizing and academic problems were associated with cyber victimization. Overall, cyber victimization was found to be a problem of substantial extent, concerning more than one in five of the studied European adolescents. Action against cyber victimization is crucial while policy planning should be aimed at the prevention of the phenomenon.

Citation: Tsitsika, A., Janikian, M., Wójcik, S., Makaruk, K., Tzavela, E., Tzavara, C., … & Richardson, C. (2015). Cyberbullying victimization prevalence and associations with internalizing and externalizing problems among adolescents in six European countries. Computers in Human Behavior, 51, 1-7.


Author(s): Barlińska, J., Szuster, A., & Winiewski, M.

Year: 2013

Title: Cyberbullying among adolescent bystanders: Role of the communication medium, form of violence, and empathy.

Journal: Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/casp.2137/pdf

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to understand how adolescents respond as bystanders of cyberbullying and to seek factors that might influence their actions. The study explored the effects of type of contact (online vs. face to face), form of violence (private vs. public), and empathy activation (affective and cognitive) on negative bystander behaviour understood as active participation in victimisation. The influence of experience of cyberbullying as perpetrator and as victim and gender on negative bystander behaviour was also controlled. Three experimental studies were conducted. The results indicate that online contact increases the likelihood of negative bystander behaviour. Private violence was less likely to elicit negative bystander action than was public violence. Previous experience of cyberperpetration was proved to increase the probability of negative bystander behaviour. Neither gender nor cybervictimisation affected the engagement in negative bystander behaviour in any of the studies. The inhibitory effect of empathy activation (both affective and cognitive) on negative bystander behaviour was demonstrated. Both types of cognitive empathy induction, emotion and behaviour focused, diminish the likelihood of negative bystander behaviour. The conclusions of the research are that negative bystander behaviour occurs more often in cyberspace than offline and that forms of intervention involving both affective and cognitive empathy may limit the negative bystander behaviour that supports cyberbullying.

Citation: Barlińska, J., Szuster, A., & Winiewski, M. (2013). Cyberbullying among adolescent bystanders: Role of the communication medium, form of violence, and empathy. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 23(1), 37-51.


Author(s): Pyżalski, J.

Year: 2012

Title: From cyberbullying to electronic aggression: Typology of the phenomenon.

Journal: Emotional and behavioural difficulties

URL: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ980057

Abstract: Cyberbullying is usually operationalised as a kind of bullying understood as peer aggression that is intentional and continuous, and involves an aspect of imbalance of power between a victim and a perpetrator or perpetrators. Despite the tool used (new media), cyberbullying often takes place within a traditional group (e.g. school class). However, cyberspace gives Internet users the opportunity to attack other individuals: people known only from the Internet, celebrities, teachers, totally unknown individuals or whole groups of people. Involvement in such actions brings suffering to those victimised as well as potential negative consequences for the perpetrators. This article presents a typology of electronic aggression based on qualitative research data (interviews with teachers and students). The typology was validated in a large quantitative survey on a representative sample of Polish 15-year-olds. The survey gives the prevalence of perpetration of different kinds of electronic aggression, as well as some influencing factors (e.g. gender) and risk and protective factors (attitudes towards school, peer norms, negative relations in the family, norms concerning online behaviour at school/home, pro-aggressive beliefs, level of self-esteem). The need to broaden prevention and intervention measures, and not restrict them to the issue of electronic peer aggression, is discussed.

Citation: Pyżalski, J. (2012). From cyberbullying to electronic aggression: Typology of the phenomenon. Emotional and behavioural difficulties, 17(3-4), 305-317.