Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Malaysia, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Balakrishnan, V.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyberbullying among young adults in Malaysia: The roles of gender, age and Internet frequency.

Journal: Computers in human behavior

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563215000357

Abstract: This study investigated the extent of young adults’ (N = 393; 17–30 years old) experience of cyberbullying, from the perspectives of cyberbullies and cyber-victims using an online questionnaire survey. The overall prevalence rate shows cyberbullying is still present after the schooling years. No significant gender differences were noted, however females outnumbered males as cyberbullies and cyber-victims. Overall no significant differences were noted for age, but younger participants were found to engage more in cyberbullying activities (i.e. victims and perpetrators) than the older participants. Significant differences were noted for Internet frequency with those spending 2–5 h online daily reported being more victimized and engage in cyberbullying than those who spend less than an hour daily. Internet frequency was also found to significantly predict cyber-victimization and cyberbullying, indicating that as the time spent on Internet increases, so does the chances to be bullied and to bully someone. Finally, a positive significant association was observed between cyber-victims and cyberbullies indicating that there is a tendency for cyber-victims to become cyberbullies, and vice versa. Overall it can be concluded that cyberbullying incidences are still taking place, even though they are not as rampant as observed among the younger users.

Citation: Balakrishnan, V. (2015). Cyberbullying among young adults in Malaysia: The roles of gender, age and Internet frequency. Computers in human behavior, 46, 149-157.


Author(s): Ang, R. P., Tan, K. A., & Mansor, A. T.

Year: 2010

Title: Normative beliefs about aggression as a mediator of narcissistic exploitativeness and cyberbullying.

Journal: Journal of Interpersonal Violence

URL: http://jiv.sagepub.com/content/early/2010/12/04/0886260510388286.full.pdf

Abstract: The current study examined normative beliefs about aggression as a mediator between narcissistic exploitativeness and cyberbullying using two Asian adolescent samples from Singapore and Malaysia. Narcissistic exploitativeness was significantly and positively associated with cyberbullying and normative beliefs about aggression and normative beliefs about aggression were significantly and positively associated with cyberbullying. Normative beliefs about aggression were a significant partial mediator in both samples; these beliefs about aggression served as one possible mechanism of action by which narcissistic exploitativeness could exert its influence on cyberbullying. Findings extended previous empirical research by showing that such beliefs can be the mechanism of action not only in offline but also in online contexts and across cultures. Cyberbullying prevention and intervention efforts should include modification of normds and beliefs supportive of the legitimacy and acceptability of cyberbullying.

Citation: Ang, R. P., Tan, K. A., & Mansor, A. T. (2010). Normative beliefs about aggression as a mediator of narcissistic exploitativeness and cyberbullying. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 0886260510388286.