Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Ireland, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Savoldi, F., & Ferraz de Abreu, P.

Year: 2016

Title: Bullying, cyberbullying and Internet usage among young people in post-conflict Belfast.

Journal: Cogent Social Sciences

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23311886.2015.1132985

Abstract: In this paper, we analyse the relationship between bullying, cyberbullying and Internet usage in the post-conflict city of Belfast, using the conceptual framework of social capital theory. Observing the results of a survey we conducted among young people, with the help of local partners, we found a paradox, according to which moderate Internet users claimed to have been more exposed to cyberbullying than heavy Internet users. In the observed context, cyberspace seems to be a more suitable place for verbal offences, in particular for vulgar messages, the high level of occurrence of which, compared to the offline environment, explains the high levels of cyberbullying. Moreover, our findings confirmed a gender pattern according to which males constitute a slight majority of bullying victims, while females are a significant majority among cyberbullying victims.

Citation: Savoldi, F., & Ferraz de Abreu, P. (2016). Bullying, cyberbullying and Internet usage among young people in post-conflict Belfast. Cogent Social Sciences, 2(1), 1132985.


Author(s): Purdy, N., & York, L.

Year: 2016

Title: A Critical investigation of the nature and extent of cyberbullying in two post-primary schools in Northern Ireland.

Journal: Pastoral Care in Education

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02643944.2015.1127989

Abstract: This study aimed to investigate internet usage among post-primary pupils in years 9, 11 and 13 in two contrasting post-primary schools in Northern Ireland, the nature and incidence of cyberbullying among these pupils, and the ways in which their schools are currently addressing the problem. A mixed methodological approach was adopted: a paper questionnaire was completed by pupils in Years 9, 11 and 13 (n = 425) in the two post-primary schools; focus group interviews were conducted with pupils from each year group (n = 18); and individual semi-structured interviews were carried out with the pastoral care coordinators (deputy heads with responsibility for pupil wellbeing) of each school (n = 2). The findings confirm that the post-primary pupils in these two schools own a range of internet-capable media devices and spend considerable time online. The incidence of cyberbullying among these pupils was relatively low, and most often consisted of hurtful or nasty comments sent via texts or posted on social networking sites. The study reveals inconsistencies between the approaches taken by the two schools, but also generally low levels of staff training, little engagement with parents, a lack of pupil confidence in the school’s ability to discuss cyberbullying openly, and a worrying absence of any systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of the schools’ current strategies for tackling this complex issue.

Citation: Purdy, N., & York, L. (2016). A critical investigation of the nature and extent of cyberbullying in two post-primary schools in Northern Ireland. Pastoral Care in Education, 34(1), 13-23.


Author(s): O’Neill, B., & Dinh, T.

Year: 2015

Title: Mobile technologies and the incidence of cyberbullying in Seven European Countries: findings from Net children go mobile.

Journal: Societies

URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4698/5/2/384/htm

Abstract: The harmful effects of bullying and harassment on children have long been of concern to parents, educators, and policy makers. The online world presents a new environment in which vulnerable children can be victimized and a space where perpetrators find new ways to perform acts of harassment. While online bullying is often considered to be an extension of persistent offline behavior, according to EU Kids Online (2011), the most common form of bullying is in person, face-to-face. With the rise in use of mobile Internet technologies, this balance is changing. Increased levels of use and more time spent online accessed through a variety of devices has increased children’s exposure to a range of online risks, including cyberbullying. This article presents the findings of the Net Children Go Mobile project, a cross-national study of children aged 9–16 in seven European countries. The research builds on the work of EU Kids Online and supports the identification of new trends in children’s online experiences of risk and safety. The study finds that while overall levels of bullying have remained relatively static, levels of online bullying have increased, particularly among younger teens. The relationship between cyberbullying and the use of mobile Internet technologies is examined and factors contributing to increased levels of cyberbullying are highlighted.

Citation: O’Neill, B., & Dinh, T. (2015). Mobile technologies and the incidence of cyberbullying in Seven European Countries: findings from Net children go mobile. Societies, 5(2), 384-398.


Author(s): Purdy, N., & Mc Guckin, C.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyberbullying, schools and the law: a comparative study in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Journal: Educational Research

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00131881.2015.1091203

Abstract: Background: This study addresses the fast developing behavioural issue of cyberbullying in schools and its complex legal context. Purpose: This study set out to investigate teachers’ perceptions of the extent of cyberbullying and the extent to which school leaders in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland feel knowledgeable and confident about dealing with cyberbullying problems in school. The study also examined the legal responsibility that schools in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland have in dealing with incidents of cyberbullying. Sample: The sample comprised 14 headteachers and senior teachers from primary and post-primary schools (focus groups), and a further 143 school headteachers in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland who responded to the postal questionnaire. Design and Methods: The sample was stratified according to geographical location, school management type and school size. The study had qualitative and quantitative elements. Focus group discussions were held in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland involving experienced primary and post-primary teachers and headteachers. Questionnaires were sent to primary and post-primary school headteachers (n = 143 completed: response rate = 28.6%). Data were analysed to provide a descriptive overview of knowledge and attitudes as well as the experiences of staff working in schools in both jurisdictions. Results: The study indicates that school leaders in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland reported a level of frustration in their attempts to deal with the growing and very complex problem of cyberbullying. They expressed a desire for more guidance from their respective government departments of education. Analysis of data suggests that confusion surrounding the legal responsibilities of schools was common in both jurisdictions. Findings indicate that rather than relying on evidence-based strategies and procedures proposed by government, school leaders were resorting to ad hoc solutions, at best consulting neighbouring schools, while trying to unravel intricate webs of interpersonal online aggressive acts, many of which had taken place outside of school and outside-of-school hours. Conclusion: Recommendations are made in relation to the development and dissemination of training and resources for schools in both jurisdictions. In describing the challenges faced by school leaders in dealing with cyberbullying, this study highlights, more generally, the need for the development of guidance and professional support frameworks to help educators manage the problems that are presented by this complex and evolving social phenomenon.

Citation: Purdy, N., & Mc Guckin, C. (2015). Cyberbullying, schools and the law: a comparative study in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Educational Research, 57(4), 420-436.


Author(s): Corcoran, L., & Mc Guckin, C.

Year: 2014

Title: Addressing bullying problems in Irish schools and in cyberspace: a challenge for school management.

Journal: Educational Research

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00131881.2013.874150

Abstract: Background: School management, in Ireland and also internationally, are currently faced with the problem of peer aggression among students both in a traditional school context and in a cyber context. Although Irish school principals are obliged to implement policy and procedures to counter bullying among students, there is a need for guidance that relates specifically to cyber-based peer aggression

Citation: Corcoran, L., & Mc Guckin, C. (2014). Addressing bullying problems in Irish schools and in cyberspace: a challenge for school management. Educational Research, 56(1), 48-64.


Author(s): O’Moore, M.

Year: 2012

Title: Cyber-bullying: The situation in Ireland.

Journal: Pastoral care in education

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02643944.2012.688065

Abstract: This paper reports on the first major survey of cyber-bullying undertaken in Ireland. While preliminary results have been published they were based on a smaller and incomplete sample of 12-16 year olds living in Ireland. The preliminary results addressed the incidence level of cyber-bullying and that of the different subcategories of cyber-bullying (text message bullying, the sending of pictures and video clips via mobile telephones, threatening calls, emails, instant messages and abuse via social networking sites and chat rooms). However, they omitted to provide a comprehensive picture of the views held by the participants to cyber-bullying. Thus the aim of the present paper is to report more thoroughly on the thoughts and feelings that students have to cyber-bullying and the ways in which they cope when subjected to cyber-bullying. The objective is to gain an understanding of cyber-bullying from the perspective of students in order that effective strategies can be developed to prevent and counter cyber-bullying. Across the sample (“n” = 3004), 13.9% reported that they had been cyber-bullied within the last couple of months and 8.6% confessed to cyber-bullying others. While 29.8% were bullied both offline and online and 24.4% bullied others online and offline, the fact that one in five students were found to be involved either as a cyber-bully, cyber-victim or both reflects that cyber-bullying is a cause of great concern to students, parents and teachers due to the emotional and behavioural problems experienced by them as a result of cyber-bullying, and one that requires urgent action. The views the students hold on cyber-bullying and their implications for prevention and intervention are discussed.

Citation: O’Moore, M. (2012). Cyber-bullying: The situation in Ireland. Pastoral care in education, 30(3), 209-223.


Author(s): Devine, P., & Lloyd, K.

Year: 2012

Title: Internet use and psychological well-being among 10-year-old and 11-year-old children.

Journal: Child Care in Practice

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13575279.2011.621888

Abstract: This paper uses data from the 2009 Kids’ Life and Times Survey, involving 3657 children aged 10 or 11 years old in Northern Ireland. The survey indicated high levels of use of Internet applications, including social-networking sites and online games. Using the KIDSCREEN-27 instrument, the data indicate that the use of social-networking sites and online games is related to poorer psychological well-being among girls, but not boys. Boys and girls who experience “cyberbullying” have poorer psychological well-being. This association between psychological well-being and some Internet applications merits more attention in future research and policy development.

Citation: Devine, P., & Lloyd, K. (2012). Internet use and psychological well-being among 10-year-old and 11-year-old children. Child Care in Practice, 18(1), 5-22.


Author(s): Jäger, T., Amado, J., Matos, A., & Pessoa, T.

Year: 2010

Title: Analysis of Experts’ and Trainers’ Views on Cyberbullying.

Journal: Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling

URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8497653

Abstract: Partners from nine European countries developed a cyberbullying training manual for the benefit of trainers working with parents, school staff and young people.1 The development of the training manual built on a two-level qualitative research process that combined elements of the Delphi method and online focus groups. The two studies outlined in this article aimed to assess trainers’ and experts’ views on the problem of cyberbullying while also gathering insight in relation to their preferences in terms of a training manual. This article outlines the main outcomes of a content analysis of experts’ and trainers’ views. According to experts and trainers, the sources of cyberbullying were specifically related to new technical developments and new patterns of usage, a lack of media literacy and media education, and the lack of appropriate laws, control and reporting mechanisms. Approaches for tackling cyberbullying suggested by experts and trainers included the provision of enhanced information on ICT and e-safety, adequate rules, monitoring mechanisms and sanctions. Furthermore a range of approaches targeting children and young people, parents and other adults, schools as well as approaches run by authorities and IT providers were suggested. In terms of the elements and style of a training manual, experts and trainers emphasised that it should be practically oriented, and that elements like narratives, case examples or video clips would be vital for the implementation of training.

Citation: Jäger, T., Amado, J., Matos, A., & Pessoa, T. (2010). Analysis of Experts’ and Trainers’ Views on Cyberbullying. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 20(02), 169-181.


Author(s): McElearney, A., Roosmale-Cocq, S., Scott, J., & Stephenson, P.

Year: 2008

Title: Exploring the anti-bullying role of a befriending peer support programme: A case study within the primary school setting in Northern Ireland.

Journal: Child Care in Practice

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13575270701868694

Abstract: Bullying remains a significant issue in the lives of many primary school children in Northern Ireland and elsewhere. Children are now experiencing direct and indirect bullying as well as cyberbullying, all of which can have significant negative consequences for health and well-being that may persist in the long term into adulthood. Many children do not tell of their bullying experience or seek help and support. While bullying has achieved a higher profile on the policy and practice agenda over the past few years, prevalence and incidence rates have improved little. Peer support programmes have increasingly been identified as an important element of whole school approaches to tackling and preventing bullying. It has been suggested that these programmes contribute by building resilience, promoting friendship and challenging negative peer group roles in bullying behaviour. This paper presents a case study that describes the process by which a befriending peer support intervention was developed in a primary school setting in Northern Ireland. The factors contributing to its role in promoting friendship and countering bullying at the school are presented.

Citation: McElearney, A., Roosmale-Cocq, S., Scott, J., & Stephenson, P. (2008). Exploring the anti-bullying role of a befriending peer support programme: A case study within the primary school setting in Northern Ireland. Child Care in Practice, 14(2), 109-130.