Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in the Czech Republic, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Bayraktar, F., Machackova, H., Dedkova, L., Cerna, A., & Ševčíková, A.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyberbullying The Discriminant Factors Among Cyberbullies, Cybervictims, and Cyberbully-Victims in a Czech Adolescent Sample.

Journal: Journal of interpersonal violence

URL: http://jiv.sagepub.com/content/30/18/3192.short

Abstract: Although the research on cyberbullying has increased dramatically in recent years, still little is known about how cyberbullying participant groups (i.e., cyberbullies, cybervictims, and cyberbully-victims) differ from one another. This study aims to discriminate between these groups at an individual and relational level by controlling for age and gender. Self-control, offline aggression, and self-esteem are analyzed as individual-level variables. Parental attachment and peer rejection are involved as relational-level variables. A total of 2,092 Czech adolescents aged 12 to 18 were enrolled from a random sample of 34 primary and secondary schools located in the South Moravian region of the Czech Republic. Discriminant function analyses indicated that the participant groups are discriminated by two functions. The first function increases the separation between cyberbullies and cyberbully-victims from cybervictims, indicating that cyberbullies and cyberbully-victims are similar to each other in terms of low self-control, offline aggression, and gender, and have higher scores on measures of low self-esteem and offline aggression. However, cyberbully-victims had the highest scores on these measures. The second function discriminates between all three groups, which indicates that those variables included in the second function (i.e., parental attachment, peer rejection, self-esteem, and age) distinguish all three involved groups.

Citation: Bayraktar, F., Machackova, H., Dedkova, L., Cerna, A., & Ševčíková, A. (2015). Cyberbullying The Discriminant Factors Among Cyberbullies, Cybervictims, and Cyberbully-Victims in a Czech Adolescent Sample. Journal of interpersonal violence, 30(18), 3192-3216.


Author(s): Ševčíková, A., Macháčková, H., Wright, M. F., Dědková, L., & Černá, A.

Year: 2015

Title: Social support seeking in relation to parental attachment and peer relationships among victims of cyberbullying.

Journal: Journal of Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools

URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=10028829&fileId=S1037291115000011

Abstract: Victims use social support seeking (SSS) to buffer the negative effects of cyberbullying. It is unknown whether cyber-victims’ perceptions of harm and having poor peer and parental relationships influence SSS. Using a sample of 451 cyberbullying-victims, aged 12–18, 68% girls, this study examined relationships of gender, harm, peer rejection, parental attachment, offline victimisation and online aggression to SSS, and tested the interaction of harm with peer rejection and parental attachment. Findings from logistic regression revealed that poor parental attachment and higher peer rejection decreased SSS, and that the association between parental attachment and SSS was stronger among cyber-victims with higher harm. This study highlights the importance of assessing cyber-victims’ attachment and experiences with their peers when implementing preventative intervention programs

Citation: Ševčíková, A., Macháčková, H., Wright, M. F., Dědková, L., & Černá, A. (2015). Social support seeking in relation to parental attachment and peer relationships among victims of cyberbullying. Journal of Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools, 25(02), 170-182.


Author(s): Macháčková, H., Dedkova, L., Sevcikova, A., & Cerna, A.

Year: 2013

Title: Bystanders’ support of cyberbullied schoolmates.

Journal: Journal of community & applied social psychology

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/casp.2135/abstract

Abstract: this study examined factors that increase or decrease the support a bystander offered to a victim of cyberbullying. Possible determinants of supportive behaviour were analyzed using a four-step hierarchical regression analysis on data from 156 Czech children (12-18 years old; M = 15.1; 54% females) who witnessed their schoolmates being victims of cyberbullying. Among individual characteristics, only a general tendency toward prosocial behaviour was a positive predictor of supportive behaviour. Other factors such as age, gender, self-esteem, and problematic relationships with peers had no effect. Among contextual factors, existing relationships with the victim, upset feelings evoked by witnessing victimization, and direct requests for help from the victim triggered supportive behaviour, while strong relationships with the bully inhibited it. Fear of intervening played no role. The practical implications of the findings are discussed with regard to the roles of the emotional response of the bystander and direct requests for help from the victim in cyberbullying interventions. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Macháčková, H., Dedkova, L., Sevcikova, A., & Cerna, A. (2013). Bystanders’ support of cyberbullied schoolmates. Journal of community & applied social psychology, 23(1), 25-36.


Author(s): Ševčíková, A., Šmahel, D., & Otavová, M.

Year: 2012

Title: The perception of cyberbullying in adolescent victims

Journal: Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

URL: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ980063

Abstract: The goal of this study was to explore how victims of cyberbullying perceive online aggressive attacks and when they see them as harmful. Interviews were carried out with 16 cybervictimised participants aged 15–17 years. The findings showed differences in the perception of online victimisation when perpetrated by an anonymous Internet user versus by a known person from the real world. The tendency of unknown online aggressors to threaten to hurt their victims offline increased the victims’ feelings of harm. Where cyberbullying interconnected with the school environment, the feeling of harm was intensified by collective perpetration, and by onlookers being personally identifiable. Where cyberbullying was a part of traditional bullying, online victimisation being discussed at school reproduced the bullying and thus the trauma. The results showed that the link between cyberbullying and the physical environment is significant with respect to the victim’s perception of its severity.

Citation: Ševčíková, A., Šmahel, D., & Otavová, M. (2012). The perception of cyberbullying in adolescent victims. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 17(3-4), 319-328.