Here is the research we’ve found on cyberbullying in Canada, with the most recent first. Please email us if you have any articles to add with the details ordered in the same format as the others.


Author(s): Deschamps, R., & McNutt, K.

Year: 2016

Title: Cyberbullying: What’s the problem?

Journal: Canadian Public Administration

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/capa.12159/full

Abstract: Cyberbullying has been a difficult problem for policy makers and observers to define. For some, cyberbullying is understood as a public health problem, while others view it largely as an education issue, and still others see it as a justice problem. In Canada, while the definition of cyberbullying continues to evolve, a nascent approach assumes that it is similar to traditional face-to-face bullying with computer-mediated communication as a new element. This definition is at odds with recent research on cyberbullying, which may have significant implications for policy makers seeking to design effective interventions.

Citation: Deschamps, R., & McNutt, K. (2016). Cyberbullying: What’s the problem?. Canadian Public Administration, 59(1), 45-71.


Author(s): Faucher, C., Jackson, M., & Cassidy, W.

Year: 2015

Title: When online exchanges byte: an examination of the policy environment governing cyberbullying at the university level.

Journal: The Canadian Journal of Higher Education

URL: http://journals.sfu.ca/cjhe/index.php/cjhe/article/view/184215

Abstract: This article reports on findings from a scan of 465 policies relevant to the handling of cyberbullying in 74 Canadian universities. It first assesses the commonalities and differences in the policies. Second, it considers how their various lenses—a human rights perspective versus a student conduct perspective, for instance—can affect the directions and outcomes of university responses. The majority of the policies reviewed were codes of student conduct and discipline, policies on electronic communication, and policies on harassment and discrimination. Most of the policies outlined complaint procedures and possible sanctions, but relatively few addressed prevention of unacceptable behaviours. Only about a third made reference to “cyber” behaviours, suggesting that the university policy environment is not current with the information and communication technologies that permeate the daily lives of university students and faculty.

Citation: Faucher, C., Jackson, M., & Cassidy, W. (2015). When online exchanges byte: an examination of the policy environment governing cyberbullying at the university level. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 45(1), 102.


Author(s): Coburn, P. I., Connolly, D. A., & Roesch, R.

Year: 2015

Title: Cyberbullying: Is Federal Criminal Legislation the Solution?

Journal: Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice

URL: http://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/cjccj.2014.E43

Abstract: Cyberbullying occurs frequently and is often a reciprocal conflict, with individual youths filling the roles of both the victim and the bully in a short period of time. Regardless of the role, involvement in cyberbullying is associated with negative outcomes and has recently been linked to the death of young people in a few cases. In an attempt to alleviate growing concerns about cyberbullying, the Canadian government passed Bill C-13 (the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act), which includes a prohibition on the posting of non-consensual intimate images. Due to the specific criteria in this section of the bill, it is unlikely that it will protect many youth from online victimization. Bill C-13 also criminalizes harassing or annoying behaviour conducted via electronic communication. This law may exacerbate the problem of non-disclosure, may be confusing to youth, and may result in too many youth and a disproportionate number of marginalized youth becoming involved in the criminal justice system. Alternative approaches to dealing with the conflict, such as increasing the use of empirically based programs that teach youth to resolve interpersonal conflict and encourage them to disclose incidents of cyberbullying, would be more effective than federal criminal legislation at protecting young people from online victimization.

Citation: Coburn, P. I., Connolly, D. A., & Roesch, R. (2015). Cyberbullying: Is Federal Criminal Legislation the Solution?. Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, 57(4), 566-579.


Author(s): Cénat, J. M., Blais, M., Hébert, M., Lavoie, F., & Guerrier, M.

Year: 2015

Title: Correlates of bullying in Quebec high school students: The vulnerability of sexual-minority youth.

Journal: Journal of affective disorders

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4641744/

Abstract: Purpose: Bullying has become a significant public health issue, particularly among youth. This study documents cyberbullying, homophobic bullying and bullying at school or elsewhere and their correlates among both heterosexual and sexual-minority high school students in Quebec (Canada). Method: A representative sample of 8194 students aged 14–20 years was recruited in Quebec (Canada) high schools. We assessed cyberbullying, homophobic bullying and bullying at school or elsewhere in the past 12 months and their association with current self-esteem and psychological distress as well as suicidal ideations. Results: Bullying at school or elsewhere was the most common form of bullying (26.1%), followed by cyberbullying (22.9%) and homophobic bullying (3.6%). Overall, girls and sexual-minority youth were more likely to experience cyberbullying and other forms of bullying as well as psychological distress, low self-esteem and suicidal ideations. The three forms of bullying were significantly and independently associated with all mental health outcomes. Conclusions: The results underscore the relevance of taking into account gender and sexual orientation variations in efforts to prevent bullying experience and its consequences.

Citation: Cénat, J. M., Blais, M., Hébert, M., Lavoie, F., & Guerrier, M. (2015). Correlates of bullying in Quebec high school students: The vulnerability of sexual-minority youth. Journal of affective disorders, 183, 315-321.


Author(s): Broll, R., & Huey, L.

Year: 2015

Title: “Just Being Mean to Somebody Isn’t a Police Matter”: Police Perspectives on Policing Cyberbullying.

Journal: Journal of school violence

URL: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1054193

Abstract: Increasing public awareness of cyberbullying, coupled with several highly publicized youth suicides linked to electronic bullying, have led lawmakers and politicians to consider new criminal legislation specifically related to cyberbullying. However, little is known about how the police currently respond to cyberbullying, and it is not clear whether new laws are necessary. In this article, the authors draw upon in-depth interviews with Canadian street patrol officers and school resource officers to explore police perspectives on policing cyberbullying. In contrast to the reactive hard-line approach proposed in much legislation and public discussion, police officers prefer to take a preventative approach by educating youth and raising awareness about the dangers of digital communications. Although there are instances when criminal charges must be laid, these incidents transcend “bullying,” a term that has little legal meaning for police officers.

Citation: Broll, R., & Huey, L. (2015). “Just Being Mean to Somebody Isn’t a Police Matter”: Police Perspectives on Policing Cyberbullying. Journal of school violence, 14(2), 155-176.


Author(s): Beran, T., Mishna, F., McInroy, L. B., & Shariff, S.

Year: 2015

Title: Children’s Experiences of Cyberbullying: A Canadian National Study.

Journal: Children & Schools

URL: http://cs.oxfordjournals.org/content/37/4/207.short

Abstract: This national study reports the prevalence of cyberbullying among youths in Canada according to demographic characteristics, its impact, and its relationship to six forms of victimization and perpetration. Cross-sectional data were obtained from a national household panel of families living in all Canadian provinces. The sample included 1,001 children ages 10 to 17 years. Frequency and multivariate analyses determined the rate and impact of cyberbullying as reported by children. Correlation analyses examined the extent to which cyberbullying was related to other types of bullying. Overall, 13.99 percent of children had been cyberbullied once or more in the past month, varying according to gender. Children who were cyberbullied were likely to experience negative outcomes on all eight domains measured. The vast majority who were cyberbullied (94.28 percent) were also targeted through at least one other type of bullying, and over a third (33.57 percent) perpetrated at least one other type of bullying. Approximately one in seven Canadian children between the ages of 10 and 17 years is cyber-victimized, and one in 13 children cyber-perpetrates. These rates are similar across demographic groups, and children who are cyberbullied or cyberbully others are likely to be involved in other forms of bullying. Authors conclude that bullying prevention and management strategies must include children’s cyber experiences.

Citation: Beran, T., Mishna, F., McInroy, L. B., & Shariff, S. (2015). Children’s Experiences of Cyberbullying: A Canadian National Study. Children & Schools, 37(4), 207-214.


Author(s): Sampasa-Kanyinga, H., Roumeliotis, P., & Xu, H.

Year: 2014

Title: Associations between cyberbullying and school bullying victimization and suicidal ideation, plans and attempts among Canadian schoolchildren.

Journal: PloS one

URL: journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0102145

Abstract: Purpose: The negative effects of peer aggression on mental health are key issues for public health. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between cyberbullying and school bullying victimization with suicidal ideation, plans and attempts among middle and high school students, and to test whether these relationships were mediated by reports of depression.

Citation: Sampasa-Kanyinga, H., Roumeliotis, P., & Xu, H. (2014). Associations between cyberbullying and school bullying victimization and suicidal ideation, plans and attempts among Canadian schoolchildren. PloS one, 9(7), e102145.


Author(s): Cénat, J. M., Hébert, M., Blais, M., Lavoie, F., Guerrier, M., & Derivois, D.

Year: 2014

Title: Cyberbullying, psychological distress and self-esteem among youth in Quebec schools.

Journal: Journal of affective disorders

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032714004509

Abstract: Background: The advent of new technologies and social media offers a host of possibilities for teenagers to consolidate social networks. Unfortunately, new technologies also represent a potential setting for experiences of victimization. Methods: The present study explores the prevalence of cyberbullying victimization in a representative sample of 8 194 teenagers in Quebec and the adverse associated consequences. Results: Results indicate that 18% of boys and close to 1 out of 4 girls report at least one incident of cyberbullying in the past 12 months. Cyberbullying victimization contributes to the prediction of low selfesteem and psychological distress over and above other experiences of bullying in schools or other settings. Conclusions: Cyberbullying appear as one important target for the design of prevention and intervention services designed for youth.

Citation: Cénat, J. M., Hébert, M., Blais, M., Lavoie, F., Guerrier, M., & Derivois, D. (2014). Cyberbullying, psychological distress and self-esteem among youth in Quebec schools. Journal of affective disorders, 169, 7-9.


Author(s): Peebles, E.

Year: 2014

Title: Cyberbullying: Hiding behind the screen.

Journal: Paediatrics & child health

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276384/

Abstract: No abstract

Citation: Peebles, E. (2014). Cyberbullying: Hiding behind the screen. Paediatrics & child health, 19(10), 527.


Author(s): Dittrick, C. J., Beran, T. N., Mishna, F., Hetherington, R., & Shariff, S.

Year: 2013

Title: Do children who bully their peers also play violent video games? A Canadian national study.

Journal: Journal of school violence

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15388220.2013.803244

Abstract: The study examined whether children who bully others are likely to prefer playing video games that are rated high in maturity and violence. A stratified random sample of Canadian children ages 10 to 17 years from the provinces of Canada was obtained. Parents (n = 397) and their children (n = 492) completed an online survey of children’s bullying behaviors and their three favorite video games. Ordinal logistic regression analyses showed that parents’ and children’s reports of child preferences for mature and violent video games were significantly related to children’s perpetration of bullying and cyberbullying. Panel regression analyses revealed no significant difference between parent and child informants. Children who play highly violent and mature video games were likely to bully and cyberbully their peers, according to both parent and child reports. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Dittrick, C. J., Beran, T. N., Mishna, F., Hetherington, R., & Shariff, S. (2013). Do children who bully their peers also play violent video games? A Canadian national study. Journal of school violence, 12(4), 297-318.


Author(s): Nordahl, J., Beran, T. N., & Dittrick, C. J.

Year: 2013

Title: Psychological impact of cyber-bullying: Implications for school counsellors

Journal: Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy/Revue canadienne de counseling et de psychothérapie

URL: http://cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/cjc/index.php/rcc/article/view/2665

Abstract: Cyber-bullying is asignificant problem for children today. This study provides evidence of the psychological impact of cyber-bullying among victimized children ages 10 to 17 years (M = 12.48, SD = 1.79) from 23 urban schools in a western province of Canada (N = 239). Students who were cyber-bullied reported high levels of anxious, externalizing, and depressed feelings/behaviours for all types of cyber-bullying they experienced, with girls reporting more severe impact than boys. Strategies are discussed for school counsellors working with youth who have been victimized through electronic means.

Citation: Nordahl, J., Beran, T. N., & Dittrick, C. J. (2013). Psychological impact of cyber-bullying: Implications for school counsellors. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy/Revue canadienne de counseling et de psychothérapie, 47(3).


Author(s): Nosworthy, N., & Rinaldi, C.

Year: 2013

Title: A review of school board cyberbullying policies in Alberta

Journal: Alberta Journal of Educational Research

URL: http://ajer.journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/ajer/article/view/1000

Abstract: An online search for school board cyberbullying/bullying policies in Alberta was conducted. The results showed that while only five school boards had a bullying policy, many schools had technology or Internet use guidelines. The online search included an assessment of one extensive school board cyberbullying policy as well as Internet use guidelines in two large school boards in Alberta. While technology and Internet use guidelines support anti-bullying initiatives, it is argued that a clear well defined policy empowers administrators to make informed decisions on how to handle cyberbullying. Finally, policy recommendations are proposed based on the results of the online search.

Citation: Nosworthy, N., & Rinaldi, C. (2013). A review of school board cyberbullying policies in Alberta. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 58(4), 509-525.


Author(s): Shapka, J. D., & Law, D. M

Year: 2013

Title: Does one size fit all? Ethnic differences in parenting behaviors and motivations for adolescent engagement in cyberbullying.

Journal: Journal of youth and adolescence

URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-013-9928-2

Abstract: Cyberbullying has become a growing concern for adolescents. This study examined differences in cyber-aggression for 518 Canadian adolescents of either East Asian or European descent (61 % female; M age = 15.24; SD = 1.68). Associations between parenting behaviors (parental control, parental solicitation, and child disclosure) and engagement in cyber-aggression, as well as motivations for engaging in cyber-aggression were explored. Adolescents completed self-report questionnaires about their engagement in cyberbullying, perceptions of their parents’ behaviors about their online activities, their motivations for cyberbullying (reactive vs. proactive), as well as several other relevant psychosocial and demographic variables (e.g., sex, age, Canadian born, mother’s education level, using a computer in a private place, and average amount of time spent online). Regression analyses showed that East Asian adolescents were less likely to engage in cyberbullying. In addition, higher levels of parental control and lower levels of parental solicitation were linked more closely with lowered reported levels of cyber-aggression for East Asian adolescents relative to their peers of European descent. In addition, East Asian adolescents were more likely to be motivated to engage in cyber-aggression for proactive reasons than reactive reasons, with the opposite found for adolescents of European descent. A significant 3-way interaction suggested that this pattern was more pronounced for East Asian males relative to East Asian females. Findings are discussed in terms of cultural differences based on the doctrines of Confucianism and Taoism.

Citation: Shapka, J. D., & Law, D. M. (2013). Does one size fit all? Ethnic differences in parenting behaviors and motivations for adolescent engagement in cyberbullying. Journal of youth and adolescence, 42(5), 723-738.


Author(s): Cassidy, W., Brown, K., & Jackson, M.

Year: 2012

Title: ‘Under the radar’: Educators and cyberbullying in schools.

Journal: School Psychology International

URL: http://spi.sagepub.com/content/33/5/520.full

Abstract: Educators play an important role in preventing cyberbullying and encouraging positive online behaviour. In this article we report on the educator portion of a study of cyberbullying at two large, technology-rich secondary schools in Canada. We discuss 17 educators’ experiences with cyberbullying, their knowledge of social networking technology, the priority they place on preventing cyberbullying, and the remedies they suggest. Qualitative analyses of taped interview responses to 16 open-ended questions revealed that they were unaware of the extent of cyberbullying among their students and although they saw prevention as a priority, and were able to pose possible solutions, no policies or programs had been implemented, even by the younger teachers, who were more technologically savvy. Nor were the educators interested in learning the results of the student portion of our research, preferring instead that cyberbullying remain under their radar. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Cassidy, W., Brown, K., & Jackson, M. (2012). ‘Under the radar’: Educators and cyberbullying in schools. School Psychology International, 33(5), 520-532.


Author(s): Cassidy, W., Brown, K., & Jackson, M.

Year: 2012

Title: ‘Under the radar’: Educators and cyberbullying in schools

Journal: School Psychology International

URL: http://spi.sagepub.com/content/33/5/520.short

Abstract: Educators play an important role in preventing cyberbullying and encouraging positive online behaviour. In this article we report on the educator portion of a study of cyberbullying at two large, technology-rich secondary schools in Canada. We discuss 17 educators’ experiences with cyberbullying, their knowledge of social networking technology, the priority they place on preventing cyberbullying, and the remedies they suggest. Qualitative analyses of taped interview responses to 16 open-ended questions revealed that they were unaware of the extent of cyberbullying among their students and although they saw prevention as a priority, and were able to pose possible solutions, no policies or programs had been implemented, even by the younger teachers, who were more technologically savvy. Nor were the educators interested in learning the results of the student portion of our research, preferring instead that cyberbullying remain under their radar.

Citation: Cassidy, W., Brown, K., & Jackson, M. (2012). ‘Under the radar’: Educators and cyberbullying in schools. School Psychology International, 33(5), 520-532.


Author(s): Wade, A., & Beran, T.

Year: 2011

Title: Cyberbullying: The new era of bullying.

Journal: Canadian Journal of School Psychology

URL: http://cjs.sagepub.com/content/26/1/44.short

Abstract: Bullying involves a powerful person intentionally harming a less powerful person repeatedly. With advances in technology, students are finding new methods of bullying, including sending harassing emails, instant messages, text messages, and personal pictures to others. Although school bullying has been studied since the 1970s, relatively little is known about students’ experiences of cyberbullying. The present study explored the prevalence of cyberbullying while also examining sex and grade differences. Results showed that a substantial proportion of students in Grades 6, 7, 10, and 11 are involved in cyberbullying: Girls are more likely than boys to be the targets of cyberbullying, and cyberbullying declines in high school. Despite significant findings, the magnitude of these group differences is small. Implications for interventions are discussed.

Citation: Wade, A., & Beran, T. (2011). Cyberbullying: The new era of bullying. Canadian Journal of School Psychology, 26(1), 44-61.


Author(s): Ryan, T., Kariuki, M., & Yilmaz, H.

Year: 2011

Title: A comparative analysis of cyberbullying perceptions of preservice educators: Canada and turkey.

Journal: The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology

URL: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ945026.pdf

Abstract: Canadian preservice teachers (year one N= 180 & year two N= 241) in this survey study were compared to surveyed preservice educators in Turkey (N=163). Using a similar survey tool both Turkish and Canadian respondents agreed that cyberbullying is a problem in schools that affects students and teachers. Both nations agreed that children are affected by cyberbullying however a lack of confidence was found in the Canadian sample yet Turkish educators believed they could both identify and manage cyberbullying. Cyberbulling in comparison to other topics covered in the current teacher preparation program, was believed to be equally important. Preservice teachers in both countries believed they should use an anti-cyberbully infused curriculum which had activities and current resources. A school-wide approach, in combination with professional development coupled with counselling from community supports was perceived to be essential to deal with cyberbullying in each country. Parents and community members were believed to be essential as was the idea that various media sources should be used to reach the larger community. As a result of their university training both Turkish and Canadian respondents felt unprepared to deal with cyberbullying. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Ryan, T., Kariuki, M., & Yilmaz, H. (2011). A Comparative Analysis of Cyberbullying Perceptions of Preservice Educators: Canada and Turkey. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology-TOJET, 10(3), 1-12.


Author(s): Li, Q

Year: 2010

Title: A study of students’ behaviors and beliefs about this new phenomenon.

Journal: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma,

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10926771003788979

Abstract: This study explores high school students’ beliefs and behaviors associated with cyberbullying. Specifically, it examines this new phenomenon from the following four perspectives: (a) What happens after students are cyberbullied? (b) What do students do when witnessing cyberbullying? (c) Why do victims not report the incidents? and (d) What are students’ opinions about cyberbullying? Data were collected from 269 Grade 7 through 12 students in 5 Canadian schools. Several themes have emerged from the analysis, which uncovers some important patterns. One finding is that over 40% would do nothing if they were cyberbullied, and only about 1 in 10 would inform adults. Students feel reluctant to report cyberbullying incidents to adults in schools for various reasons, which are discussed in depth. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Li, Q. (2010). Cyberbullying in high schools: A study of students’ behaviors and beliefs about this new phenomenon. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 19(4), 372-392.


Author(s): Mishna, F., Cook, C., Gadalla, T., Daciuk, J., & Solomon, S.

Year: 2010

Title: Cyber bullying behaviors among middle and high school students.

Journal: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20636942

Abstract: Little research has been conducted that comprehensively examines cyber bullying with a large and diverse sample. The present study examines the prevalence, impact, and differential experience of cyber bullying among a large and diverse sample of middle and high school students (N = 2,186) from a large urban center. The survey examined technology use, cyber bullying behaviors, and the psychosocial impact of bullying and being bullied. About half (49.5%) of students indicated they had been bullied online and 33.7% indicated they had bullied others online. Most bullying was perpetrated by and to friends and participants generally did not tell anyone about the bullying. Participants reported feeling angry, sad, and depressed after being bullied online. Participants bullied others online because it made them feel as though they were funny, popular, and powerful, although many indicated feeling guilty afterward. Greater attention is required to understand and reduce cyber bullying within children’s social worlds and with the support of educators and parents. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Mishna, F., Cook, C., Gadalla, T., Daciuk, J., & Solomon, S. (2010). Cyber bullying behaviors among middle and high school students. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 80(3), 362-374.


Author(s): Cassidy, W., Jackson, M., & Brown, K. N.

Year: 2009

Title: Sticks and stones can break my bones, but how can pixels hurt me? Students’ experiences with cyber-bullying.

Journal: School Psychology International

URL: http://extension.fullerton.edu/professionaldevelopment/assets/pdf/bullying/sticks_and_stones.pdf

Abstract: Educators and the public alike are often perplexed with the enormous and evolving cyber mise en scene. Youth of the digital generation are interacting in ways our fore-mothers and fathers never imagined – using electronic communications that until 30 years ago never existed. This article reports on a study of cyber-bullying conducted with students in grades 6 through 9 in five schools in British Columbia, Canada. Our intent was to quantify computer and cellular phone usage; to seek information on the type, extent and impact of cyber-bullying incidents from both bullies’ and victims’ perspectives; to delve into online behaviours such as harassment, labelling (gay, lesbian), negative language, sexual connotations; to solicit participants’ solutions to cyber-bullying; to canvass their opinions about cyber-bullying and to inquire into their reporting practices to school officials and other adults. This study provides insight into the growing problem of cyber-bullying and helps inform educators and policy-makers as to appropriate prevention or intervention measures to counter cyber-bullying. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Citation: Cassidy, W., Jackson, M., & Brown, K. N. (2009). Sticks and stones can break my bones, but how can pixels hurt me? Students’ experiences with cyber-bullying. School Psychology International, 30(4), 383-402.


Author(s): Beran, T., & Li, Q.

Year: 2008

Title: The relationship between cyberbullying and school bullying.

Journal: The Journal of Student Wellbeing

URL: http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/JSW/article/view/172

Abstract: Many children are likely to experience aggression in their relationships with schoolmates. With the advent of modern forms of communication, children are now able to harass their peers with mobile phones and e-mails, a behaviour known as cyberbullying. To determine the relationship between school bullying and cyberbullying, 432 students from grades 7–9 in Canadian schools were surveyed about their experiences of bullying. The results indicated that students who were bullied in cyberspace were also likely to bully their peers in cyberspace (r = 0.46, p < 0.001) and be bullied at school (56%). In addition, students who were bullied in cyberspace only, and students bullied both in cyberspace and at school, experienced difficulties at school such as low marks, poor concentration, and absenteeism. These results suggest that bullying that occurs either at or outside school can have an impact on school learning.

Citation: Beran, T., & Li, Q. (2008). The relationship between cyberbullying and school bullying. The Journal of Student Wellbeing, 1(2), 16-33.


Author(s): Li, Q.

Year: 2008

Title: Cyberbullying in schools: An examination of preservice teachers’ perception.

Journal: Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology/La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie

URL: http://www.cjlt.ca/index.php/cjlt/article/viewArticle/494/225

Abstract: This study examines preservice teachers’ perceptions about cyberbullying. Specifically, the following questions guide the research: (i) To what extent are preservice teachers concerned about cyberbullying? (ii) How confident are preservice teachers in managing cyberbullying problems? (iii) To what extent do preservice teachers feel prepared to deal with cyberbullying? (iv) To what extent do preservice teachers think that school commitment is important? Survey data were collected from 154 preservice teachers enrolled in a two-year post-degree program in a Canadian university. The results show that although a majority of the preservice teachers understand the significant effects of cyberbullying on children and are concerned about cyberbullying, most of them do not think it is a problem in our schools. In addition, a vast majority of our preservice teacher have little confidence in handling cyberbullying, even though the level of concern is high.

Citation: Li, Q. (2008). Cyberbullying in schools: An examination of preservice teachers’ perception. Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology/La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie, 34(2).


Author(s): Li, Q.

Year: 2008

Title: A cross-cultural comparison of adolescents’ experience related to cyberbullying.

Journal: Educational Research

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00131880802309333

Abstract: Background and purpose: This study explores the issues of cyberbullying from a cross-cultural perspective. The focus is on the examination of the extent of a sample of Canadian and Chinese adolescents’ experiences and possible culture differences related to bullying and cyberbullying.

Citation: Li, Q. (2008). A cross-cultural comparison of adolescents’ experience related to cyberbullying. Educational Research, 50(3), 223-234.


Author(s): Li, Q

Year: 2006

Title: Cyberbullying in schools: A research of Gender Differences

Journal: School psychology international

URL: http://eclass.uoa.gr/modules/document/file.php/PPP357/cyberbullying%20in%20schools.pdf

Abstract: This study investigates the nature and the extent of adolescences’ experience of cyberbullying. A survey study of 264 students from three junior high schools was conducted. In this article, ‘cyberbullying’ refers to bullying via electronic communication tools. The results show that close to half of the students were bully victims and about one in four had been cyber-bullied. Over half of the students reported that they knew someone being cyberbullied. Almost half of the cyberbullies used electronic means to harass others more than three times. The majority of the cyber-bully victims and bystanders did not report the incidents to adults. When gender was considered, significant differences were identified in terms of bullying and cyberbullying. Males were more likely to be bullies and cyberbullies than their female counterparts. In addition, female cyberbully victims were more likely to inform adults than their male counterparts.

Citation: Li, Q. (2006). Cyberbullying in schools a research of gender differences. School psychology international, 27(2), 157-170.